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What is GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

  • By Kanan Team
  • 30-10-2021
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“GRE Quantitative Reasoning is a part of the GRE General Test, which assesses your basic math skills and ability to reason quantitatively and tackle problems using quantitative methods.” Like verbal and analytical writing (awa), the GRE Quants section contains 4 question types, where students who master them will get a good GRE score of 160+ out of 170.

Millions of students take the GRE to study for a master’s degree in top universities. If you want to pursue your favourite master’s program in countries like Canada, the US, etc., you must take the GRE General test conducted by ETS. It’s a standardized exam, having GRE Quantitative Reasoning and two other sections. Quantitative Reasoning is different from Verbal Reasoning and Analytical Writing mainly for its math skills and concepts. To get the latest syllabus, practice questions with answers, key topics, etc., go through this entire blog.

GRE Quantitative Reasoning Syllabus

According to ETS, the GRE Quantitative Reasoning syllabus includes four different types of questions:

  1. Quantitative Comparison Questions
  2. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice
  3. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices
  4. Numeric Entry Questions

Each question from the above question type appears independently or as a set of questions. If it appears as sets of questions, then they are called the Data Interpretation set. These questions are based on the data from the tables, graphs, etc. In addition, the GRE quants section uses mathematical concepts (below) to test your skills, concepts and abilities.

  • Arithmetic - includes properties and types of integers, prime numbers, remainders arithmetic operations, exponents and roots, etc.
  • Algebra - includes factoring and simplifying algebraic expressions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, coordinate geometry, including graphs of functions, equations and inequalities, etc.
  • Geometry - includes parallel and perpendicular lines, circles, triangles, equilateral and 30°-60°-90° triangles, congruent and similar figures, area, perimeter, and so on. 
  • Data Analysis - includes basic descriptive statistics like the mean, median, mode, range, etc., followed by interpretation of data in tables and groups, probability and so on.

Don’t confuse these topics with critical thinking skills or with any other essay section that leads to some GRE issue. 

What are the types in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning contains four (4) different question types.

  1. Quantitative Comparison Questions
  2. Multiple-choice questions - select one answer choice
  3. Multiple-choice questions - select one or more answer choices
  4. Numeric entry questions

Each type of question is designed to test your basic mathematical skills and your ability to reason quantitatively. Ultimately, this section is making you ready for a world-class master’s program.
 

  1. Quantitative Comparison Questions - You will be given a piece of information, followed by two quantities (A and B). You need to compare Quantity A and Quantity B based on the given piece of information and select the correct answer.
  2. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice - Here, you will get a question and a list of 5 options. After going through the question, you need to select any one of the 5 options available.
  3. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices - A question is given along with a list of alternatives to choose. You must select one or more answer choices as per the question asked. Please note that, if the question does not mention how many options to choose, choose all that apply. 
  4. Numeric Entry Questions - This type of question allows you to solve a maths problem and asks you to enter your answer as an integer or a decimal number. Sometimes it requires you to enter it as a fraction in two separate boxes (one for numerator and one for denominator).

What is ‘Quantitative Comparison Questions’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

‘Quantitative Comparison Questions’ is a question type in GRE Quantitative Reasoning that allows you to compare two sets of quantities (A and B) with a given piece of information. After going through you need to find out which option describes the comparison accurately. If none of them is accurate, you can choose - ‘The relationship cannot be determined from the information given’ option. 

Sample Topics for Quantitative Comparison Questions in GRE Quantitative Reasoning

To sharpen your skills, make use of the following sample topics for quantitative comparison questions in GRE Quantitative Reasoning.

1. Sample Topic 1 in Quantitative Comparison Questions 

Quantity A                                                           Quantity B
The least prime number greater than 24       The greatest prime number less than 28

  1. Quantity A is greater.
  2. Quantity B is greater.
  3. The two quantities are equal.
  4. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.
     
    Explanation:
    For the integers greater than 24, note that 25, 26, 27, and 28 are not prime numbers, but 29 is a prime number, as are 31 and many other greater integers. Thus, 29 is the least prime number greater than 24, and Quantity A is 29. For the integers less than 28, note that 27, 26, 25, and 24 are not prime numbers, but 23 is a prime number, as are 19 and several other lesser integers. Thus, 23 is the greatest prime number less than 28, and Quantity B is 23 in your writing assessment. The correct answer is Choice A, Quantity A is greater.

2. Sample Topic 2 in Quantitative Comparison Questions

Lionel is younger than Maria.

Quantity A                                Quantity B
Twice Lionel's age                    Maria's age

  1. Quantity A is greater.
  2. Quantity B is greater.
  3. The two quantities are equal.
  4. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.
     
    Explanation
    If Lionel's age is 6 years and Maria's age is 10 years, then Quantity A is greater, but if Lionel's age is 4 years and Maria's age is 10 years, then Quantity B is greater (not based on critique or opinion). Thus, the relationship cannot be determined. The correct answer is Choice D, the relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

3. Sample Topic 3 in Quantitative Comparison Questions

w > x > 0 > y > z
Quantity A         Quantity B
w + y                    x + z

(A) Quantity A is greater.
(B) Quantity B is greater.
(C) The two quantities are equal.
(D) The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.
 
Explanation
The correct answer is (A).
 
In this problem, there are four variables: w, x, y, and z. You are asked to compare the values of the sums of pairs of variables and give the correct response. You know the relative values of the different variables, but you don’t know the actual amounts. You do know that two of the variables (w and x) must be positive and two of the variables (y and z) must be negative numbers.
 
In this case, think about the different sums as pieces of the whole. If every “piece” in one quantity is greater than a corresponding “piece” in the other quantity, and if the only operation involved is addition, then the quantity with the greater individual values will have the greater total value. From the given information, we know the following:
 
w > x
y > z
 
The first term, w, in Quantity A is greater than the first term, x, in Quantity B. Similarly, the second term, y, in Quantity A is greater than the second term, z, in Quantity B. Because each piece/position in Quantity A is greater than the corresponding piece in Quantity B, Quantity A must be greater; the answer is (A).

Find sample topics of ‘Quantitative Comparison Questions’ here.

What is ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

In GRE Quantitative Reasoning, ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ is a question type that gives you a mathematical question with five different options. You need to solve the question and choose the correct option from them. In the GRE Analytical Writing practice questions with answers, you will get a lot of sample questions for this type of question. It enables you to improve your basic calculation speed. 

Sample Topics for ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning

Below are some of the sample topics for multiple-choice questions in Select One Answer Choice in GRE Quantitative Reasoning.

1. Sample Topic 1 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice

If 5x + 32 = 4 - 2x, what is the value of x?

  1. -4
  2. -3
  3. 4
  4. 7
  5. 12

Explanation
Solving the equation for x, you get 7x = -28 and so x = -4. The correct answer is Choice A, - 4.

2. Sample Topic 2 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice

A certain jar contains 60 jelly beans - 22 white, 18 green, 11 yellow, 5 red, and 4 purple. If a jelly bean is to be chosen at random, what is the probability that the jelly bean will be neither red nor purple?

  1. 0.09
  2. 0.15
  3. 0.54
  4. 0.85
  5. 0.91

Explanation

Since there are 5 red and 4 purple jelly beans in the jar, there are 51 that are neither red nor purple and the probability of selecting one of these is 51/60. Since all of the answer choices are decimals, you must convert the fraction to its decimal equivalent, 0.85. Thus the correct answer is Choice D, 0.85.

3. Sample Topic 3 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice

A car got 33 miles per gallon using gasoline that cost $2.95 per gallon river. Approximately what was the cost, in dollars, of the gasoline used in driving the car 350 miles?

  1. $10
  2. $20
  3. $30
  4. $40
  5. $50

Explanation
Scanning the answer choices indicates that you can do at least some estimation and still answer confidently. The case used 350/33 gallons of gasoline, so the cost was (350/33)(2.95) dollars. You can estimate the product (350/33)(2.95) by estimating 350/33 a little low, 10, and estimating 2.95 a little high, 3, to get approximately (10)(3) = 30 dollars. You can also use the calculator to compute a more exact answer and then round the answer to the nearest 10 dollars, as suggested by the answer choices. The calculator yields the decimal 31.287…, which rounds to 30 dollars. Thus the correct answer is Choice C, $30.

Find more sample topics of ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ here.

What is ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices’ is one of the question types in GRE Quantitative Reasoning, where you will be given a question and asked to select one or more correct answer choices from a list of choices. The number of choices to select may or may not be specified in the question.

Sample Topics for ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning

The sample topics for ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning are as follows. By practising these, you are sure to get an understanding of this question type.

Sample Topic 1 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices

1. Which of the following integers are multiples of both 2 and 3?
Indicate all such integers.

  1. 8
  2. 9
  3. 12
  4. 18
  5. 21
  6. 36

Explanation
You can first identify the multiples of 2, which are 8, 12, 18, and 36, and then among the multiples of 2 identify the multiples of 3, which are 12, 18, and 36. Alternatively, if you realize that every number that is a multiple of 2 and 3 is also a multiple of 6, you can identify the choices that are multiples of 6. The correct answer consists of Choices C (12), D(18), and F (36).

2. Sample Topic 2 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices

Each employee of a certain company is in either Department X or Department Y as per the phrases, and there are more than twice as many employees in Department X as in Department Y. The average (arithmetic mean) salary is $25,000 for the employees in Department X and $35,000 for the employees in Department Y. 

Which of the following amounts could be the average salary for all of the employees of the company?
Indicate all such amounts.

  1. $26,000
  2. $28,000
  3. $29,000
  4. $30,000
  5. $31,000
  6. $32,000
  7. $34,000

Explanation
One strategy of the paragraph for answering this kind of question is to find the least and/or greatest possible value. Clearly the average salary is between $25,000 and $35,000, and all of the answer choices are in this interval. Since you are told that there are more employees with the lower average salary, the average salary of all employees must be less than the average of $25,000 and $35,000, which is $30,000. If there were exactly twice as many employees in Department X as in Department Y, then the average salary for all employees would be, to the nearest dollar, the following weighted mean, (2)(25,000) + (1)(35,000)/2 + 1 = 28,333 dollars where the weight for $25,000 is 2 and the weight for $35,000 is 1. Since there are more than twice as many employees in Department X as in Department Y, the actual average salary must be even closer to $25,000 because the weight for $25,000 is greater than 2. This means that $28,000 is the greatest possible average. Among the choices given, the possible values of the average are therefore $26,000 and $28,000. Thus, the correct answer consists of Choices A ($26,000) and B ($28,000).

Intuitively, you might expect that any amount between $25,000 and $28,333 is a possible value of the average salary. To see that $26,000 is possible, in the weighted mean above, use the respective weights 9 and 1 instead of 2 and 1. To see that $28,000 is possible, use the respective weights 7 and 3.

3. Sample Topic 3 in Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices
Which of the following could be the units digit of  where n is a positive integer?
Indicate all such digits.

  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9

Explanation
The units digit of  is the same as the units digit of  for all positive integers n. To see why this is true for  compute  by hand and observe how its units digit results from the units digit of  Because this is true for every positive integer n, you need to consider only powers of 7. Beginning with  and proceeding consecutively, the units digits of 7,   and  are 7, 9, 3, 1, and 7, respectively. In this sequence, the first digit, 7, appears again, and the pattern of four digits, 7, 9, 3, 1, repeats without end. Hence, these four digits are the only possible units digits of and therefore of  The correct answer consists of Choices B (1), D (3), H (7), and J (9).

Find more sample topics of ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ here.

What is ‘Numeric Entry Questions’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

‘Numeric Entry Questions’ question type comes with a question and asks you to enter your answer as an integer or a decimal in a single answer box or to enter it as a fraction in two separate boxes (one for numerator and one for denominator). In GRE Quantitative Reasoning, you will probably use the computer mouse and a keyboard to answer this type of question.

Sample Topics for Numeric Entry Questions in GRE Quantitative Reasoning

If you’re a test-taker, you can use the sample topics for numeric entry questions in GRE Quantitative Reasoning to know what this question type is all about.

Sample Topic 1 in Numeric Entry Questions

Rectangle R has length 30 and width 10, and square S has length 5. The perimeter of S is what fraction of the perimeter of R ?

 The answer space consists of a fraction bar, and two boxes, one above and one below the fraction bar.
Explanation
The perimeter of R is 30 + 10 + 30 + 10 =80,  and the perimeter of S is (4)(5)=20  Therefore, the perimeter of S is  20/80 of the perimeter of R. To enter the answer 20/80  you should enter the numerator 20 in the top box and the denominator 80 in the bottom box. Because the fraction does not need to be reduced to lowest terms, any fraction that is equivalent to 20/80 is also considered correct, as long as it fits in the boxes. For example, both of the fractions 2/8 and 1/4 are considered correct. Thus the correct answer is 20/80 (or any equivalent fraction).
 
Sample Topic 2 in Numeric Entry Questions
 
2. A merchant made a profit of $5 on the sale of a sweater that cost the merchant $15. What is the profit expressed as a percent of the merchant's cost?
Give your answer to the nearest whole percent.
The answer space consists of a dollar sign, followed by a box for the answer.%
Explanation
The percent profit is (5/15)(100)= 33.333  =33.3 percent, which is 33%, to the nearest whole percent. Thus the correct answer is 33% (or equivalent).

If you use the calculator and the Transfer Display button, the number that will be transferred to the answer box is 33.333333, which is incorrect since it is not given to the nearest whole percent. You will need to adjust the number in the answer box by deleting all of the digits to the right of the decimal point.

Also, since you are asked to give the answer as a percent, the decimal equivalent of 33 percent, which is 0.33, is incorrect. The percent symbol next to the answer box indicates that the form of the answer must be a percent. Entering 0.33 in the box would give the erroneous answer 0.33%.

Sample Topic 3 in Numeric Entry Questions

3. Working alone at its constant rate, machine A produces k liters of a chemical in 10 minutes. Working alone at its constant rate, machine B produces k liters of the chemical in 15 minutes. How many minutes does it take machines A and B, working simultaneously at their respective constant rates, to produce k liters of the chemical?
The answer space consists of a dollar sign, followed by a box for the answer. minutes

Explanation
Machine A produces k/10 liters per minute, and machine B produces k/15 liters per minute. So when the machines work simultaneously, the rate at which the chemical is produced is the sum of these two rates, which is k/10 + k/15 = k(1/10 +1/15) =k(25/150)=k/6 liters per minute. To compute the time required to produce k liters at this rate, divide the amount k by the rate k/6 to get k/k/6=6  Therefore, the correct answer is 6 minutes (or equivalent).

One way to check that the answer of 6 minutes is reasonable is to observe that if the slower rate of machine B were the same as machine A's faster rate of k liters in 10 minutes, then the two machines, working simultaneously, would take half the time, or 5 minutes, to produce the k liters. So the answer has to be greater than 5 minutes. Similarly, if the faster rate of machine A were the same as machine B's slower rate of k liters in 15 minutes, then the two machines would take half the time, or 7.5 minutes, to produce the k liters. So the answer has to be less than 7.5 minutes. Thus the answer of 6 minutes is reasonable compared to the lower estimate of 5 minutes and the upper estimate of 7.5 minutes.

Find more sample topics of ‘Numeric Entry questions’ here.

What is ‘Data Interpretation Sets’ in GRE Quantitative Reasoning?

‘Data Interpretation Sets’ is a set of questions asked in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section. Even though it is not used frequently, you must know what it’s all about. Data Interpretation Sets involve a set of questions that are given based on the same data presented in tables, graphs, or other forms of data.

Sample Topics for Data Interpretation Sets in GRE Quantitative Reasoning

A few sample topics for Data Interpretation Sets in GRE Quantitative Reasoning are available here.

Annual Percent Change in Dollar Amount of Sales at Five Retail Stores from 2006 to 2008

Store Percent Change
from 2006 to 2007
Percent Change
from 2007 to 2008
P 10 -10
Q -20 9
R 5 12
S -7 -15
T 17 -8

1. If the dollar amount of sales at Store P was $800,000 for 2006, what was the dollar amount of sales at that store for 2008?
$727,200
$792,000
$800,000
$880,000
$968,000

Explanation
According to Figure 8, if the dollar amount of sales at Store P was $800,000 for 2006, then it was 10 percent greater for 2007, which is 110 percent of that amount, or $880,000. For 2008 the amount was 90 percent of $880,000, which is $792,000. The correct answer is Choice B, $792,000.
Note that in your thoughts an increase of 10 percent for one year and a decrease of 10 percent for the following year does not result in the same dollar amount as the original dollar amount because the base that is used in computing the percents is $800,000 for the first change but $880,000 for the second change.

2. At Store T, the dollar amount of sales for 2007 was what percent of the dollar amount of sales for 2008?
Give your answer to the nearest 0.1 percent.
The answer space consists of a box for the answer followed by the % symbol.%
 
Explanation
If A is the dollar amount of sales at Store T for 2007, then 8 percent of A, or 0.08A is the amount of decrease from 2007 to 2008. Thus A - 0.08A = 0.92A is the dollar amount for 2008. Therefore, the desired percent can be obtained by dividing A by  which equals A/.092A = 1/0.92 = 1.0869565.... Expressed as a percent and rounded to the nearest 0.1 percent, this number is 108.7%. Thus the correct answer is 108.7% (or equivalent).

3. Based on the information given, which of the following statements must be true?
Indicate all such statements.

  1. For 2008 the dollar amount of sales at Store R was greater than that at each of the other four stores.
  2. The dollar amount of sales at Store S for 2008 was 22 percent less than that for 2006.
  3. The dollar amount of sales at Store R for 2008 was more than 17 percent greater than that for 2006.

Explanation

For Choice A, since the only data tasks given in Figure 8 are percent changes from year to year, there is no way to compare the actual dollar amount of sales at the stores for 2008 or for any other year. Even though Store R had the greatest percent increase from 2006 to 2008, its actual dollar amount of sales for 2008 may have been much smaller than that for any of the other four stores, and therefore Choice A is not necessarily true.
For Choice B, even though the sum of the two percent decreases would suggest a 22 percent decrease, the bases of the percentages are different. If B is the dollar amount of sales at Store S for 2006, then the dollar amount for 2007 is 93 percent of B, or  and the dollar amount for 2008 is given by  which is  Note that this represents a percent decrease of  percent, which is not equal to 22 percent, and so Choice B is not true.

For Choice C, if C is the dollar amount of sales at Store R for 2006, then the dollar amount for 2007 is given by  and the dollar amount for 2008 is given by  which is  Note that this represents a 17.6 percent increase, which is greater than 17 percent, so Choice C must be true.

Therefore, the correct answer consists of only Choice C (The dollar amount of sales at Store R for 2008 was more than 17 percent greater than that for 2006).
 
Find more about sample topics of ‘Data Interpretation Sets’ here.

Topics and Concepts covered under GRE Quantitative Reasoning

GRE Quantitative Reasoning covers a wide range of topics necessary for understanding mathematical concepts at the graduate level and also solving problems quantitatively. That’s why it assesses the student’s skills and abilities in the four content areas below.

  1. Arithmetic
  2. Algebra
  3. Geometry
  4. Data Analysis

The content covered in these areas is taken from high school mathematics and statistics. However, it does not include topics like trigonometry, calculus or any other higher-level mathematics. Please note that the candidate is allowed to use a basic calculator for this GRE Quants section.

Official GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Questions PDF

Are you looking for the Official GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Questions PDF format? It’s available here. It contains sample questions with answers for all question types, including data interpretation sets. Please remember that these practice questions and answers are on the ETS official website in individual web pages, not exactly as the Official GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Questions PDF format. 

GRE Quant Score and How it is calculated?

To know the GRE Quantitative Reasoning score and how it is calculated by ETS, refer to the table below. Since ETS does not use a manual calculator or any software technology for evaluation, this table shows exactly how your individual GRE raw score is interpreted into GRE Quant score and its percentile.

S No. GRE Quant Score GRE Quant Score Percentile GRE Raw Score Number of Correct Answers
1 170 97 35 - 40 35 - 40
2 165 90 30 - 35 30 - 35
3 160 77 25 - 30 25 - 30
4 155 65 20 - 25 20 - 25
5 150 45 15 - 20 15 - 20
6 145 25 10 - 15 10 - 15
7 140 10 5 - 10 5 - 10
8 135 3 0 - 5 0 - 5
9 130 <1 0 0

The GRE Quant Score reported from 130 - 170 is given in 1-point increments, where 130 is the lowest and 170 is the highest score. Make a note that the GRE score has a validity of 5 years only. It’s unbiased, which means it applies to all international students.

What is the average GRE Quant score?

In the GRE General Test conducted by ETS, the Verbal and Quant sections are scored between 130 and 170. “The average GRE Quant score is around 150 and 152”. This average (mean) GRE score in Quantitative Reasoning can change in subsequent tests based on the students’ performance.

Top 10 GRE Quantitative Reasoning Tips

Like a GRE topper, boost your preparation with more GRE quantitative reasoning mock tests. To be competitive before you reach your test day, follow these top 10 GRE Quantitative Reasoning tips that structure you to get the perfect score in GRE.

  1. Try to keep all the best books for GRE Quant in hand, including GRE Quantitative Reasoning sample questions.
  2. Get a clear understanding of the concepts and skills required for the GRE Quant section.
  3. In the ‘Quantitative Comparison’ type of question look for the connection between two quantities and the given text. That helps you to find the correct answer.  
  4. In the ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice’ type of question, read the instructions first to keep important details in mind.
  5. In the ‘Multiple-Choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choice’ question type, avoid lengthy calculation by counting all numerical patterns.
  6. In the ‘Numeric Entry’ question type, round your answer to the nearest accuracy, which fetches you good scores.
  7. In the ‘Data Interpretation Sets’ read the instructions and the data carefully before answering. It will help you to look for minute details. 
  8. Practise for at least 3 months to clear this GRE Quants section effortlessly.
  9. Evaluate your progress daily, count your minutes and plan your preparation accordingly. 
  10. Finally, get guidance from a GRE expert or tutor like many people do to keep you motivated throughout the entire process.

14 Effective Problem-Solving Strategies for GRE Quantitative Reasoning

There are no separate ideas or a GRE Quantitative Reasoning study guide by any author, but there are 14 Problem-Solving Strategies that seem to be effective for most of the test-takers. These strategies do not form a complete list and are not presented in any specific instruction order. During your preparation, you can follow some of these strategies that suit you to achieve a good final score. 

Strategy 1: You can translate from Words to an Arithmetic or Algebraic Representation
Strategy 2: You can translate from Words to a Figure or Diagram if it helps you to understand better
Strategy 3: You can translate from an Algebraic to a Graphical Representation for specific questions
Strategy 4: You can translate from a Figure to an Arithmetic or Algebraic Representation
Strategy 5: Clarify the questions of an Arithmetic or Algebraic Representation
Strategy 6: You can add to a Geometric Figure
Strategy 7: You need to understand the question pattern
Strategy 8: Look for any mathematical relationship
Strategy 9: Evaluate the task
Strategy 10: Do practice a lot
Strategy 11: Separate each question into a case
Strategy 12: Make solutions suitable to each problem
Strategy 13: Find out whether the given conclusion pertains to the information
Strategy 14: Find out what extra information is required to tackle the problem

Mistakes You Need to Avoid in GRE Quants Section 

After answering all the questions, you might wonder why the score is reduced. It’s because you made that one simple mistake while applying the formula, interpreting the data or calculating the numbers. To ensure the best GRE score, first, know the common mistakes you need to avoid in the GRE Quants section identified based on a survey.

  • Do not use minimum GRE Quantitative Reasoning examples’ questions with answers. Instead, use the maximum resources available both offline and online.
  • Do not completely rely on a calculator; use your basic calculating skills too. During the GRE test time, it helps a lot.
  • Do not skip any questions while in the actual GRE exam.  
  • Do not stay with one question if you get stuck up. Move on to the next question immediately.
  • Do not forget to check all answers in the end as evidence. 

Summary

GRE Quantitative Reasoning is one of the important sections in the GRE General Test. If you’re good at math concepts during school days, you will probably know how to tackle this section. If not, then don’t worry! There are many ways to start from scratch and score more than an experienced learner. All you need to do is fix up a deadline, follow time management, and practice till your exam date.

FAQs

1. How do I study for GRE Quantitative Reasoning?
Unlike GMAT, to study for GRE Quantitative Reasoning, first, you need to understand the GRE quant section, skills required, etc., and then start with the basic math concepts like how you learn grammar. Once you’re familiar with that, you can start practising sample questions and answers. Through continuous practice, you can easily gain speed and confidence and ultimately to achieve a top score.  

2. What is the Quantitative Reasoning section in the GRE?
The Quantitative Reasoning section in the GRE General Test is to measure your basic mathematical skills, ability to reason quantitatively and to model and solve problems. This GRE Quant section contains 4 question types as follows:

  1. Quantitative Comparison Questions
  2. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One Answer Choice
  3. Multiple-choice Questions - Select One or More Answer Choices
  4. Numeric Entry Questions

Similar to GRE Quants, the Analytical Writing (awa) section has issue essays and argument essays and the Verbal section has three question types, used for thesis purposes too.

3. Is GRE Quant hard?
No. GRE Quant is not that hard. If you understand the basic math concepts like Algebra, Arithmetic, etc., you are sure to crush this test easily. However, don’t take this section very lightly. Give your best in the preparation without losing focus that eventually boosts your confidence.

4. What is the good Quantitative Reasoning score for GRE?
A good Quantitative Reasoning score for GRE is 165+ out of 170. It equals to 90 percentile in GRE Quants score.

5. How can I get 170 Quant on GRE?
Getting a 170 score in the GRE quant section is hard, but not impossible. You must practice all sample questions available and try to get 170 in all of them. Adding to that, you can also get useful tips and tricks from the best books or from YouTube channels. 

6. Is a 164 GRE quant score good?
Yes, of course! Scoring 164 in GRE quants is good whether it’s a paper-based (writing) or a computer-delivered test (typing). Only a few could reach that score using logical thinking and reasoning, despite hard work and dedication.

 

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About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

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Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.

Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

kanan-ftr-phone+91 63597 73959

kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

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Locations

Navsari|Ahmedabad|Surat|Vadodara|Vallabh VidyanagarChennai|Dehradun|Vapi|Nadiad|Thrissur|Karnal|Indore|Bardoli

About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.