IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test

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Table of Contents

  1. IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test 
  2. IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 1
  3. IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 2
  4. IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 3
  5. IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 4 
  6. Answers for IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test
  7. Conclusion 

In this IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information mock test, your task is to solve the given questions by matching the given statements to the paragraphs in the reading text. The statements can be facts, descriptions or explanations and you need to figure out which paragraphs contain the given statements. And, understand, sometimes a paragraph can be used more than once as an answer. Instructions will be provided, if it is the case.

IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 1 

Answer questions 1-6 which are based on the reading passage below.

 Birth of the Internet

  1. The story of the internet commences with two computers which were kept miles apart and were intended to send a message. The first-ever characters sent by the internet are recorded as 'LO'. The original message attempted was 'LOG IN', but the computer crashed just after sending LO, and the remaining letters were never sent. The world has been ever-changing since 29th October 1969 as the internet was born in Stanford Research Institute by establishing the first-ever link between computers on the ARPANET. The entire team of engineers was led by Leonard Kleinrock. At that time, he never thought that this discovery would change things forever connecting machines and thereby, people sitting right across the desk or across continents.

  2. Experiments with computer networks started in the late 1960s with four computers. It was called ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network). The project was initiated by the U.S. government to compete with Soviets who launched the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik. The four ARPANET computers were stationed at UCLA, UC Santa Barbara, SRI International and the University of Utah.

  3. In July 1961, Leonard Kleinrock published a paper on the Packet switching theory and then a book on the same subject in 1964. Both were the earliest documents on the subject. He also convinced Lawrence G. Roberts, an MIT researcher, to apply packet connectivity in place of conventional circuits for effective computer communication. In August 1962, J.C.R. Licklider of MIT was the first to give the idea of a worldwide computer network through a series of memos while discussing his concept of ‘Galactic Network’. This concept was the predecessor of the Internet of today.

  4. The other crucial step was to make computers ‘communicate’ with each other. To experiment this, Roberts and Thomas Merrill worked together in 1965. They established a connection between the TX-2 computer in Massachusetts and the Q-32 computer in California with the help of a low-speed dial-up telephone line. It was a small setup, but it gave birth to the first-ever computer network covering a large geographical area (WAN- wide area network).

  5.  As a result of the experiment, Roberts realised that the time-shared computers could work reasonably well together, retrieving data and running programs as necessary on the remote machines, but the telephone system based on circuit switching was inefficient for completion of the job. This confirmed Kleinrock’s conviction of the requirement for the packet switching technique.

Questions 1-6

The reading passage has 6 paragraphs, A-E. 

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter, A-E, as your answer to each question.

Note: You may choose any letter more than once.

  1. An initiative to be in the race 
  2. Remotely situated machines managed to exchange a message 
  3. Preference for new technology over the old
  4. A test validating the need for an efficient technique 
  5. The first network via the telephone system 
  6. The earliest documents mentioning global computer network

Also read: IELTS academic reading tips

IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 2

Answer questions 1-7 which are based on the reading passage below.

LANGUAGES AT THREAT

  1. According to linguists, nearly half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the globe today are in danger of extinction. Research shows that these languages are falling out of use at the rate of about one language every two weeks. According to a study supported by the National Geographic society and the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages, there are five regions in the world where languages are disappearing more rapidly. They include Northern Australia, Central South America, North America's upper Pacific coastal zone, Eastern Siberia and Oklahoma and Southwest United States. All these areas have a population of aboriginal people who are in low numbers and who speak diverse languages.

  2. A language can vanish in an instant, for example, if the only speaker of the language dies. Others are lost because of existing multiple cultures that result in the dominance of a given language over indigenous tongues. This often occurs in cases where the dominant language is regarded as more prestigious. When people are convinced that they will earn more respect or a good job if they speak the dominant language, they are bound to dump the minority language. Parents eventually stop speaking the minority language at home and the children grow up knowing very little of it. This is what happened to Manx and what is happening to Welsh. Consider the dominance of the English language. Today it threatens the survival of 54 indigenous languages in the Northwest Pacific plateau of North America. 

  3. Linguists are also concerned about languages that borrow too much from other languages. For instance, if a language borrows words, vocabulary, and then grammar, it eventually becomes difficult to call the two languages separate. This often happens in languages that are almost similar. A good example is that of Ulster Scots and Scots that are becoming more and more diluted by the English language. However, studies have also shown sad cases of communities that have been pressured to give up their own culture and language. Such is the case of the ethnic Kurds found in Turkey who are forbidden by law to print or teach their own language. 

  4. A language is safe if it has many young speakers and if it has the support of the state where it is spoken. However, not all is lost as there have been success stories of revival of almost extinct or a dead language. The term sleeping beauty languages have been used to express such hopes. Hebrew was reintroduced to a new generation of native speakers. The revival of Hebrew was successful due to favorable conditions such as the creation of a nation state in which Hebrew became the national language. The dedication of Eliezer Ben Yehuda efforts also bore fruit as he created new words for the modern terms that Hebrew did not have. Institutional and political support can also help revive an almost extinct language. Take the example of the Irish language that is well supported as the national language of Ireland despite the dominance of the English language.
     
  5. Languages that are no longer being learnt by children are considered on the brink of extinction or as being moribund, and unless drastic measures are taken, such languages can die within a generation. In New Zealand, Maori communities have come up with nursery schools that are taught by elders and conducted in the Maori language. This model has been extended in Alaska, and Hawaii. In California, young people have become apprentices to older adult speakers who live in the community in a bind to revive sleeping beauty languages. 

  6. According to David Harrison, assistant professor of linguistics at Swarthmore College, most of the languages that are on verge of extinction have no dictionary, text, or record of the accumulated knowledge and history of the disappearing culture. Linguists are trying to learn as much as possible of the almost extinct languages so that even if the language disappears knowledge of the language will be left intact. Researchers are making videotapes, audiotapes, and written records of the language and their translations. The rules of the languages and the vocabularies are being analyzed to allow the writing of dictionaries and grammars. Such efforts make revival of sleeping beauty languages very possible.

Questions 1-7

The reading passage has six paragraphs, A-F. 

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter, A-F, as your answer to each question.

Note: You may choose any letter more than once.

  1. Reference to intermixing of languages as a threat 
  2. Reference to areas facing language extinction at a faster pace 
  3. Examples of efforts by natives to save languages 
  4. Mention of two factors which can protect a language
  5. Reference to lack of documentation in the disappearing languages
  6. Mention of better prospects as a reason for dominance of a language 
  7. An example of how policies can damage a language

Check more IELTS academic reading locating information exercise with answers 

IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 3

Answer questions 1-7 which are based on the reading passage below.

Endangered Languages

  1.  To understand the terms ‘revival’ and ‘revitalisation’, first you have to understand the current state of these languages. Linguists have a variety of grim-sounding terms for languages with few or no native speakers. A language which has no native speakers (people who grew up speaking the language as a child) is called dead or extinct. A language which has no native speakers in the youngest generation is called moribund. A language which has very few native speakers is called endangered or imperilled.

  2.  Language revival and language revitalisation are attempts to preserve endangered languages. Of the 800 plus Amerindian languages, five hundred are endangered or worse. Most of the others are in Central and South America; in North America, only Navajo usage is increasing, and even the relatively healthy languages like Cherokee - spoken by 22,000 people - are threatened by low percentages of children learning the languages.

  3.  It is true that in the natural course of things, languages, like everything else, sometimes die. People choose, for a variety of valid social reasons, not to teach their children their own mother tongue. In the case of American Indian languages, however, the language drop-off has been artificially induced and precipitous, and just as with the human-caused endangered species crisis, it is worth doing something about it. Amerindian languages were deliberately destroyed, particularly in North America.

  4.  In the earlier days of European contact, Indians were separated from their linguistic kin and resettled hundreds of miles away with individuals from other tribes who couldn't understand each other. Historically, this is the single most effective way to eliminate minority languages (for obvious reasons). Even as recently as the 50s, Indian children were forcibly removed from non-English-speaking households and sent to boarding schools to be socialised. They were routinely punished there for speaking their languages, and Indian-speaking parents began hiding their languages in the hope of keeping their children in their houses or at least making school life easier for them. The percentage of Cherokee children being raised bilingually fell from 75% to 5% during the US boarding-school-policy days.

  5.  Other languages, with smaller user bases and no literary tradition like the Cherokees to buoy them, have died entirely. This was not a natural death. Existing linguistic communities do not normally lose their languages after losing a war, even after being conquered and colonised, the way immigrant groups do. The usual pattern is bilingualism, which may be stably maintained indefinitely. Most West Africans have been raised bilingually ever since colonisation there; so have many natives in South America, where the linguistically destructive policies used by the US and Canada were never implemented. In Paraguay, for example, more than 90% of the population is bilingual in Spanish and Guarani and has been for centuries.

  6.  Now that the Amerindian languages of North America are in a precarious situation, simply leaving them alone will not cause their extinction trends to end. Once the majority of the young people in a community don't understand a language any more, its usage declines rapidly. This is where language revival is the resurrection of a dead language, one with no existing native speakers. Language revitalisation is the rescue of a dying language.

Questions 1-7

The reading passage has 6 paragraphs, A-F.

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter, A-F, as your answer to each question.

Note: You may choose any letter more than once.

  1. The purpose of language revival and revitalisation
  2. Mention of way to eliminate minority languages
  3. Different terms for describing the language which has zero or few native speakers
  4. Mention of intentionally annihilating language
  5. Stopping caring about the language extinction is not a solution
  6. Bilingualism is a way to prevent the language extinction
  7. Boarding school suppressed the freedom to speak one language


For full IELTS practice test click here 

If your intent is performing well in this task, then this IELTS academic reading locating information mock test will definitely support you for that. Also, check out other IELTS academic reading question types in the IELTS academic reading section, if you’re interested.


IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test - Question 4

Answer questions 1-5 which are based on the reading passage below.

DROSERA - A CARNIVOROUS PLANT

  1.  Carnivorous plants are predatory flowering plants that trap and kill small creatures to derive nutrients from their body. The carnivorous flowers often attract their prey by bright colours, nectar, or scent. The prey can be insects, protozoa or small animals such as lizards and mice that are trapped by suction traps or pitfalls made up of modified leaves or flypaper traps with sticky secretions. Most of these plants will still grow without eating insects, but they grow much faster and reproduce better if they absorb nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from their prey. Not every plant that traps and kills small animals is considered carnivorous. Some capture insects in their flowers to allow pollination. They do not kill the insects, and in case the insect dies inside the flower, it is unfortunate and not to the advantage of the plant.

  2.  Drosera is one of the most popular carnivorous plants and is often called Sundews as the flower looks like it is covered in dew. Due to the large number of seeds it produces, this carnivorous plant can be found in almost every part of the world except the Antarctic. Nearly 200 different species of this plant have been identified. Most of them are common in nutrient-deficient places such as sandy beaches and bogs. The Australian Drosera pygmaea is the smallest and has leaves that measure 5 mm. The largest Drosera flower is referred to as king Drosera and grows up to 60 cm. Depending on the species, the sundews can form either prostrate or upright rosettes. These plants can live up to 50 years. 

  3.  Drosera plants trap their prey with the help of mucilage, a thick, glue-like fluid. The tips of bright coloured tentacles on the leaves of Drosera plants secrete mucilage which glistens like dew drops. The insects get attracted considering them drops of nectar, and as they sit on the tentacles, they get ensnared. Upon sensing the touch of an insect, mucilage production increases and coats the insect further. The struggle to escape triggers the leaves to roll lengthwise towards the centre by thigmotropism, thus covering the insect completely. This helps the plant to easily digest the prey as more digestive glands come in contact with it. The time taken in tentacle movement can vary from a few minutes to a couple of hours.

  4.  The flowering season of Drosera plants is late summer or early spring. The flowers open one at a time and last just one day. They blossom in the morning and close by afternoon. Self-pollination takes place inside the closed flower, and large quantities of spindle-shaped seeds are produced. These get released, and under perfect horticultural conditions, they find their way into the neighbourhood and readily germinate. The sundew is thus regarded as a weed. The sundew is among the easiest carnivorous flowers to keep indoors, and most carnivorous plants enthusiasts grow the plant very well in the open air or on sunny window sills.

Questions 1-5 

The reading passage has 4 paragraphs, A-D.

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter, A-D, as your answer to each question.

Note: You may choose any letter more than once.

  1. Drosera is not seen in Antartica
  2. Peculiar characteristics of Carnivorous plants
  3. Trapping method of Drosera
  4. Mention of king drosera
  5. Right conditions for the blossoming of drosera

Find IELTS academic reading locating information list of questions 

Answers for IELTS Academic Reading Locating Information Mock Test

Check out the sample answers for the mock test that you’ve done.

Also check IELTS academic reading locating information tips .

Conclusion

Hope these 4 IELTS academic reading mock tests will prepare you to achieve a 7.5+ band score in the IELTS Reading test. Connect with us to get free tips, strategies and worksheets. 

 

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Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

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About Kanan International

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Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.