IELTS academic reading matching features mock test

  • By Kanan Team
  • kanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-facebookkanan-ftr-linkedinkanan-ftr

Table of Contents

  1. IELTS academic reading matching features mock test
  2. IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question 1
  3. IELTS academic reading matching features mock test - Question 2
  4. IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question-3
  5. IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question 4
  6. Answers for IELTS academic reading mock test
  7. Conclusion

This IELTS academic reading matching features mock tests have practice questions that help to gain knowledge about the question type. In matching features you will be provided with the reading passage from which you have to match the given statements with the people, event or period. You must read the passage carefully to match the correct answer from reading passage.

IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question 1

Answer questions 1-8 which are based on the reading passage below.


The Chicken Tikka Masala Story

Organisers of National Curry Week claim that if all the portions sold in one year in the UK were stacked on top of each other they would constitute a tikka tower 2,770 times taller than the Greenwich Millennium Dome and yet in an article in The Daily Telegraph in November 1999, journalist Amit Roy referred to it as “a dish which does not exist in Indian cuisine”. So the question is, “is it a genuine Indian dish or isn’t it?” The name of this enigma? Chicken Tikka Masala: the flagship dish of Britain’s newly acclaimed ‘national cuisine’, boasting a huge 14.6% of the sales of the almost half a million curries consumed, on average, in the restaurants and homes of the United Kingdom every day of the year. Chicken Tikka Masala, or CTM as it was affectionately dubbed by writer Colleen Grove in ‘Spice n Easy Magazine’ in November 1994, is one of those culinary fables that lend a touch of intrigue and excitement to an already exotic cuisine.

Amit Roy was quite correct to observe that the dish does not hail from India and that it was specifically created to appeal to the British palate by some very astute restaurateurs. This much is not in doubt, but when one moves on to the history of the dish, fact becomes fiction and depends on just who one talks to. No ‘Indian’ chef seems to have produced any real evidence that he or she first invented the dish and it is commonly thought that its invention came about almost by accident. Journalist and restaurateur Iqbal Wahhab claims it was created when a Bangladeshi chef produced a dish of traditional Chicken Tikka only to be asked “Where’s my gravy?” The response was, supposedly, a can of cream of tomato soup and a few spices and the ‘masala’ element was born.

Top food writer Charles Campion refers to CTM as, “a dish invented in London in the Seventies so that the ignorant could have gravy with their chicken tikka”. Several chefs have made claims to the invention of CTM, but none with any evidence or witness support so the mystery will have to remain. The descendants of Sultan Ahmed Ansari, who owned the Taj Mahal in Glasgow claim he invented it in the 1950s, but there is no other evidence of the dish at this early date or of the tandoor in Glasgow. 
The tandoor, which boosted tikka sales, had not even arrived in Britain at that time, having only been introduced to the first Indian restaurant, Moti Mahal in New Delhi in 1948. In fact, this can be seen as the birth of CTM in its original form of Butter Chicken. Lala Kundan Lal Gujral first set up in Peshawar in 1920 but came to Delhi in 1947 to set up Moti Mahal. He worked with a local man to produce the first restaurant version of the tandoor and invented a tandoori spice mix for tandoori chicken - ground coriander seeds, black pepper and mild red pepper. Called Murg Makhani in Hindi, Butter Chicken originated in the 1950s at the Moti Mahal restaurant in Old Delhi. Famed for its Tandoori Chicken, the cooks there used to recycle the leftover chicken juices in the marinade trays by adding butter and tomato. This sauce was then tossed around with the tandoor-cooked chicken pieces and presto - Butter Chicken was ready! The leftover dish appealed to Delhites and was quickly lapped up by the rest of the world.

So impressed was India's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru by Kundan Lal's dishes that Moti Mahal became a permanent fixture in all his state banquets. Legend has it that when former Soviet premier Nikita Kruschev was asked what he liked about India, he replied, ''Taj Mahal and Moti Mahal''. When the Shah of Iran came on a state visit to India, the Indian Education Minister Maulana Azad told him that coming to Delhi without eating at Moti Mahal was like going to Agra and not seeing the Taj Mahal.
Top restaurateur Amin Ali, owner of The Red Fort and Soho Spice in London’s Soho, remembers serving CTM when he first arrived in London in 1974. A lowly waiter at the time he remembers wondering just what the dish was. CTM was introduced to Waitrose by G.K.Noon in 1983 when he was still in the United States, and by the end of the Millennium, it was generally acknowledged as the most popular single dish in Britain. 

For something that is so popular with the public and with the restaurateurs who make their living from it, Chicken Tikka Masala is very much a Cinderella of culinary creations. Very few recipes for CTM appear in the plethora of Indian Cuisine cookbooks that have appeared over the last twenty years and Alan Davidson’s recent ‘Oxford Companion to Food’ does not even consider it deserving of a listing. Indeed, such are the passions it generates in the industry, that many top chefs refuse to cook or serve it due to its complete ‘lack of authenticity’.
Mridula Baljekar is one of the few cookery writers to have included CTM in her bestselling ‘Complete Indian Cookbook’ (1993) including food colouring and tomato puree, as well as double cream and almonds. Chef Mohammed Moneer introduces yet another ingredient with half a cup of coconut milk instead of cream.

Chicken Tikka Masala was most certainly invented in Britain, probably by a Bangladeshi chef, and is so popular it is even being served in some hotel restaurants in India and Bangladesh. It does not come from the Raj or the kitchens of the Moghul Emperors, but millions of people enjoy it every year, and perhaps that is all the pedigree it needs!

Questions 1 - 8

Look at the following statements (Questions 1-8) and the list of people, A - I, below.

Match each statement with the correct person.

Write the correct letter, A-I, as your answer.

1 He asserts that the dish was born as a quick response to a customer’s demand.
2 He presented an analogy between a restaurant and a well-known monument.
3 He noted that Chicken Tikka Masala was made to suit the British taste. 
4 He replaced one of the ingredients.
5 He used the acronym CTM in his article.
6 He served the dish without having any knowledge about it.
7 He has not mentioned Chicken Tikka Masala in his book.
8 He introduced Chicken Tikka Masala to Waitrose.

List of People

A Colleen Grove
B Amit Roy
C Iqbal Wahhab
D Charles Champion
E Nikita Kruschev
F Maulana Azad
G Amin Ali
H G K Noon
I Alan Davidson
J Mohammed Moneer

Also read: IELTS academic reading tips

IELTS academic reading matching features mock test - Question 2

Answer questions 1-6 which are based on the reading passage below.

THE MENACE OF FAKE NEWS

A      Social media has reached a saturation point with all forms of content being promoted or showcased In their desperation to sell products, advertisers use any available strategy, and not only disregard business ethics but also give scant consideration to public sentiments. It is not uncommon to find bold banners flashing 'breaking news' headlines designed to attract visitors to read the thrilling news. The targets of this so-called breaking news are usually top government officials, wealthy business tycoons, or celebrities. The news may be about the private life of celebrities, some scandal or even the death of a famous personality.

B     Fake news is a deliberate attempt to spread wrong information, whether by regular media channels or via social media with the intent to gain financially or politically by misleading the public. The recent news about the demise of Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, published on a new website is a good example of fake news. Once visitors are attracted to the news, a click on the link will take them to a product page. This deceitful form of advertising is called bait advertising. On the issue of bait advertising, social media magnate, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook had an open altercation with Wladimir Palant, the founder of Eyeo's and the developer of AdBlock Plus, over the organization's effort to block unsolicited adverts by publishers. A blocking statistics firm managed by Mihir Patkar estimated that the use of AdBlock Plus has grown by 70% from June 2013 to June 2014, 41% of the users falling between the ages of 18 to 29. The 144 million active AdBlock users on the web reflect the enormity of the problem and indicate the worrying level of dissatisfaction caused to internet users by these disturbing advertisements.

C     According to Hunt Allcott, New York University, and Matthew Gentzkow, Stanford University, there is new evidence pointing to the pivotal role played by false stories on social media prior to the US Presidential election in 2016. Taking into account archives of fact-checking websites, audience data, and an online survey they found that social media, though not dominant as a source of news during the run-up to the elections, did play an important role. Barack Obama criticized Facebook for the spread of fake news that was in favor of Donald Trump. According to a media report, Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, promised steps to tackle the problem of fake news on Facebook.

D     In countries like Austria and Germany, the situation is much the same. Politicians from the two countries were on the defensive against the perilous surge of fake news on social media preceding the election campaign in Austria, and the 2017 parliamentary elections in Germany. A preliminary injunction on the European branch of Facebook was placed by an Austrian court, compelling it to block posts that had earmarked Green Party Chairwoman Eva Glawischnig. Spread via fake the posts described Glawischnig as a 'lousy traitor of the people,' and a 'corrupt klutz.' In Austria, the posts in question were blocked, but they can still be accessed in other places in Europe. However, Glawischnig's attorney considered the verdict a success. 'I think that the floodgates have been opened. Many people have now seen that there are options and will follow our example.' 

E     Criticism and a widespread protest against Facebook for not acting on the menace of fake news and bait adverts have given some results. Adam Mosseri, Vice President of Facebook, announced on December 15, 2016, the News Feed plan to address hoaxes and fake news. One method, he said, was facilitating easier reporting for Facebook users. On spotting any fake story, (the matter can be reported at the click of a button. Identifying a fake story by running it through a fact-checking machine is another recommendation.

F     Scientists have identified words and phrases predicting the reliability of the posts on sites like Twitter, in an effort to tackle the fake news menace. 'There have been many studies about social media credibility in recent years, but very little is known about what type of words or phrases create credibility perceptions during rapidly unfolding events,' says Tanushree Mitra, a PhD candidate at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who led the research on fake news.

G     The fact that fake news has the capacity to change the outcome of a country's election is a worrying factor. Timely research to address this worrying situation is of the essence if we are to stop this problem from spiralling out of control.

Questions 1 - 6

Look at the following statements (Questions 1-6) and the list of people, A - I, below.

Match each statement with the correct person.

Write the correct letter, A-I, as your answer.

1     use of linguistic features to judge the authenticity of uploads on social sites 


2     the displeasure of a huge number of people towards unwanted promotions 

3     need of an action before the problem goes out of hand

4     defaming a political party candidate 

5     a positive outcome of a negative incident 

6     extensive disapproval of inaction by a social networking site

 
     
     
     
A     breaking news' headlines designed to attract visitors

B     144 million active AdBlock

C     Criticism and a widespread protest against Facebook

D     posts that had earmarked Green Party Chairwoman 

E     Spread via fake profile,

F     effort to tackle the fake news menace.

G      Timely research

Check more IELTS academic reading matching features exercise with answers

IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question-3

Answer questions 1-3 which are based on the reading passage below.

The Origin of Language

The question of the origin of language is one that has been raised and discussed repeatedly at least since the eighteenth century. Before that, it was supposed that language must have been part of God’s gift to Adam. There was a tradition of linguistic inquiry that sought to discover what original tongue it was that Adam spoke, but the question of how he came to be able to speak at all was not really raised
In the eighteenth century, especially in France, the idea that human characteristics could be accounted for by nature rather than by Divine gift, was widely discussed, and such figures as Rousseau, Condillac and Maupertuis, among others, attempted to show that language could have had natural beginnings or could have been invented by natural reason. There were some who countered this – for example, the Lutheran pastor Sussmilch who, in 1756, attempted to refute the arguments of Maupertuis that language was an invention by showing that its intricate and systematic patterning could not be the product of human reason alone but must have been the creation of God.However, it was the German philosopher Herder who in 1772 won the competition set by the Berlin Academy of Sciences with an essay that refuted all arguments for a Divine origin of language. For a long time, his statement was considered to have settled the question

However, it soon became apparent that this was impossible. In reconstructing the ancestors of languages presently spoken it was realized that all you could do was to reconstruct versions of language which, though precedents for contemporary forms, were no different in principle from those that could be directly observed. It was realized that such reconstructions, whatever they might tell us about how specific languages change with time, could throw no light on the The nineteenth century saw the development of historical linguistics and, for a time, this seemed to give new life to the question of language origins. It was found that careful and systematic comparison of related languages could lead to a reconstruction of older languages of which they were descendants. In particular, much effort was expended in the reconstruction of Indo-European, the language proposed as ancestral to many languages of Europe and some of India. For a time it was thought that such historical work could lead to an understanding of the nature of earlier forms of language and perhaps, eventually, to an insight into its earliest form.

However, it soon became apparent that this was impossible. In reconstructing the ancestors of languages presently spoken it was realized that all you could do was to reconstruct versions of language which, though precedents for contemporary forms, were no different in principle from those that could be directly observed. It was realized that such reconstructions, whatever they might tell us about how specific languages change with time, could throw no light on the issue of how language came about in the first place.
Furthermore, as historical work proceeded and more and more languages were carefully examined, it appeared that the changes languages undergo with time, though to some degree lawful, were neither consistent nor progressive. It was not found, for instance, that older languages were simpler than contemporary languages, nor was it found possible to show that any of the various types of language proposed — such as ‘isolating’, ‘agglutinating’ or ‘inflecting’ — represented earlier or later stages in language development. In other words, the changes that languages were found to undergo with time were manifestly not to be accounted for by any clear process of evolution. The practitioners of historical linguistics, accordingly, abandoned any quest for a general theory of language development, and they gave up the idea that their work could throw light on language origins.
By the end of the first decade of the twentieth century, the emphasis in linguistics had shifted from historical analysis to the analysis of the synchronic structure of languages. De Saussure’s argument that historical (diachronic) analysis was not relevant for understanding the organisation of a given linguistic system when considered in its use by a community of speakers had an important influence. In addition, Franz Boas and his pupil Edward Sapir, working in North America, showed that the languages of the Native Americans had to be understood in their own terms since they had grammars and sound systems that could not be comprehended in terms of systems derived from European languages.

This work helped to show that the languages of so-called ‘primitive’ peoples were just as complicated as the most sophisticated and modern of European languages and that there was no evidence for the preservation of earlier forms of language. The development of methods for describing the diversity of human languages became a major preoccupation for linguistics, and questions about the origin of the human capacity for language, or of how languages had evolved from earlier forms to those of the present, seemed less and less relevant. Speculation about language origins thus appeared worthless, for there was no evidence on which it could be based. Anyone’s guess was as good as another’s. The wastepaper baskets of London were perhaps, after all, the best destination for such imaginings.

Questions 1 – 3

Look at the following statements and the list of people below.

Match each statement with the correct person. 

1      Felt that historical analysis was irrelevant.
2      Believed that it was impossible for all languages to be explained with one system.
3      Felt that human language was Divine.

List of People 

A Condillac
B Boas
C Herder
D Sussmilch
E De Saussure

For full IELTS practice test click here


IELTS academic reading matching features mock test is like giving you a chance to practice this question type at home while you prepare for the IELTS academic reading section. Also, learn more about the other IELTS academic reading question types to enhance your answering skills.

IELTS academic reading matching features mock test Question 4

Answer questions 1-5 which are based on the reading passage below.

OLDEST FOSSILS FOUND?

For thousands of years, people have been fascinated by fossils. The ancient Greeks were correctly able to interpret fossils as the remnants of impressions of creatures that died and got embedded in sediments. The word ‘fossil’ in its modern context refers to the physical manifestation of former life from an era earlier than recorded by human history. There is no recognized age at which any evidence can be considered as a fossil. While the occurrence of fossils around the world is common, only a small number make their way to fossil records. 

So how are fossils formed? The most important factor in the formation of fossils is the immediate burial of remains of an organism as exposure to predators or the elements can destroy them. Muddy areas or sandy soil is better as the creature gets buried for fossilisation to take place. After burial, the soft tissues decay quickly leaving the hard body parts like bones or shells behind. Gradually, sediment deposits over the remains and hardens into rock. Depending on the natural minerals present in the sediment, fossilization takes place. Once the rocky layer preserving the vestiges erodes, the remains are exposed as fossils. 

According to scientists, they have discovered the oldest fossils of the world, estimated to have formed some 3.77 to 4.28 billion years ago. Found in Canada, these microfossils consist of filaments and tiny tubes made of iron oxide. It is believed that they are the remnants of bacteria which lived around hydrothermal vents on the seabed and derived energy from iron-based chemical reactions. If this is true, these fossils will be the oldest confirmation of life on Earth, offering valuable information into the origin of life.

Matthew Dodd from University College, London who is the leading author of the research says, “If these rocks do indeed turn out to be 4.28 billion years old, then we are talking about the origins of life developing very soon after the oceans formed 4.4 billion years ago.” As iron-oxidising bacteria exist even today, these findings underline the achievement of such microorganisms. “They have been around for 3.8 billion years at least,” says Dominic Papineau, the main author from UCL.

According to the research team, this finding strengthens the theory that life appeared and diversified quickly on Earth. Also, the discovery shows a path to research for the existence of life on any other planet of our solar system where oceans existed once. “If we look at similar old rocks from Mars and we can’t find evidence of life, then this certainly may point to the fact that Earth may be a very special exception and life might just have arisen on Earth,” remarks Dodd. The discovery is, however, heading for a hot debate, much like the microfossil discovery that was reported in Western Australia.
An expert on ancient fossil bacteria, Frances Westall, who works at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, is not convinced by this study. She says, “The thing that bothers me most about these structures is the fact that they all seem to be extremely oriented. They are parallel to each other, and microbes don’t grow parallel to each other.”

Questions 1-5

Look at the following statements (Questions 1-5) and the list of people or the group below.

Match each statement with the correct person or group A, B, C or D.

Write the correct letter, A, B, C or D as your answer.

You may use any letter more than once.

1 Iron-oxidising bacteria have been existing for over three billion years. 
2 Various forms of life evolved at a great speed on Earth.
3 Our Earth is unique to bear life.
4 The discovered fossils do not match with the formation pattern of bacteria.
5 There is not much time gap between the formation of oceans and the beginning of life.


List of people

A Matthew Dodd
B Dominic Papineau
C Frances Westall
D The Research Team

 

Find IELTS academic reading matching features practice questions

Answers for  IELTS  academic reading mock test

Check out: IELTS academic reading matching features sample answers

Also check IELTS academic reading matching features tips

Conclusion

To sum up, this mock test is considered as one of the practice sessions ahead of facing the final exams. Solving the questions will raise your confidence and also help to know about the test pattern and help to solve.

Kanan Blog

The latest tips and news from Kanan International team

4

Making your study abroad planning exciting, bright and way more easier.

Sign up for a free 30-minute consultation

study abroad consulation

Making your study abroad planning exciting, bright and way more easier.

Sign up for a free 30-minute consultation

study abroad consulation

Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017. Ph: +91 73051 21113

kanan-ftr-phone+91 63570 12000

kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

kanan-ftr-fbkanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-youtube

About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

kanan-ftr-logo

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.

Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

kanan-ftr-phone+91 63597 73959

kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

kanan-ftr-fbkanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-youtube

Locations

Navsari|Ahmedabad|Surat|Vadodara|Vallabh VidyanagarChennai|Dehradun|Vapi|Nadiad|Thrissur|Karnal|Indore|Bardoli

About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.