IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions

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Table of Contents

  1. IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions
  2. 5 IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions & tips to solve them ( With Answer key)
  3. IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 1
  4. IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 2
  5. IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 3
  6. IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 4
  7. Answers for practice questions
  8. IELTS academic reading table completion question list for practice
  9. Conclusion

Following IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions are given by IELTS experts in order to train your scanning skills for solving table completion. In this task, you will be provided with two or more passages followed by an incomplete table with blanks. You are required to fill the blanks based on the information given in the reading passage

In this article you will find 5+ IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions. This is one of the important IELTS academic reading question types. Try these practice questions to enhance your reading skills required for solving the  IELTS academic reading test

5 IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions & tips to solve them ( With Answer key)

Before answering the IELTS academic reading table completion practice questions use the tips given by the experts to solve the questions easily. Pick up the word that makes the information complete and correct according to the passage. You must fill the gaps with exact words from the passage. Remember to maintain the number of words limit.

Also read IELTS academic reading tips 

 

IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 1

Answer the question 1-7 which are based on the reading passage below


Biometrics

The word "biometrics" can be broken down into two parts - bio (life) and metrics (to measure). It is derived from the Greek word. Biometrics is a combination of technologies which measures and analyses the person's physiological and behavioral characteristics including fingerprints, voice patterns, irises and hand measurements for identification and verification purposes. In the 14th Century, China practiced biometrics in the form of fingerprinting. Merchants in China stamp their children's palm and footprints on the paper to identify the specific young children from others. This way of biometric identification is still alive today. 

Until the late 1800s, identification was primarily based on 'photographic memory.' In order to overcome the difficulty of identifying convicted criminals, Alphonse Bertillon, an anthropologist and police desk clerk in Paris, created biometrics as a separate field of study. Bertillonage is a system of multiple body measurements that he invented. The idea that adult bone dimensions do not vary after the age of 20 is the foundation of his approach. He also devised a cataloguing system that made the filling and verifying of records a breeze. Until 1903, when two identical measurements were recorded for two separate people at Fort Leavenworth Prison, this system was frequently used by police authorities. The Bertillonage was never used again, and the institution moved to fingerprinting. The police begined to use the fingerprinting, developed by Richard Edward Henry of Scotland Yard, which resembles the methods used by Chinese for years, after the failure of Bertillonage system.

Biometrics started using more than ten different methods in the past three decades. Numerous companies have been involved in the development and continue to enhance the methods by using the available technology. Concern about privacy issues is increasing, as the industry grows. Laws and regulations are being in the ongoing process of drafting and standards are starting to be developed. Still, no other biometric has not been used in a wide range of fingerprinting. Some are used in both legal and business areas. 

Identification and verification have long been done by presenting a personal document such as a driver's licence, ID card, or passport. It may require personal data such as passwords or PINs. Due to safety concerns, two or all three methods are sometimes integrated. As time goes on, we'll need more secure and precise measures. In corporate and public security systems, point-of-sale applications, and consumer electronics, biometric verification for authentication has become a commonly used system.

Questions 1 - 5

Complete the table below.
Choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Years Instances/Events
14th Century 1_______ is practiced by Chinese in the form of 2_______
Until the 3_____ 1800s Identification was primarily relied upon 4_______
Until 5_______ Bertillon system is frequently used by police authorities

Check answer for this exercise

Check more IELTS academic reading table completion exercise with answers

 

IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 2

Answer the question 1-8 which are based on the reading passage below

Chronicle of Timekeeping 

According to archaeological evidence, the Babylonians began to measure time at least 5,000 years ago, long before the Roman Empire. They used calendars to coordinate communal activities, plan the shipment of goods, and, in particular, regulate planting and harvesting. Their calendars were based on three natural cycles: the solar day, which is defined by successive periods of light and darkness as the earth rotates on its axis; the lunar month, which follows the phases of the moon as it orbits the earth; and the solar year, which is defined by the changing seasons that accompany our planet's revolution around the sun. 

The moon had a stronger social impact before the development of artificial light. And, for those who lived near the equator, the waxing and waning of the equator were more noticeable than the passing of the seasons. As a result, the moon cycle had a greater influence on calendars created at lower latitudes than the solar year. The solar year, on the other hand, became more important in more northern latitudes when seasonal agriculture was practiced. As the Roman Empire moved northward, it centered its activity calendar on the solar year for the most part.

The moon had a stronger social impact before the development of artificial light. And, for those who lived near the equator, the waxing and waning of the equator were more noticeable than the passing of the seasons. As a result, the moon cycle had a greater influence on calendars created at lower latitudes than the solar year. The solar year, on the other hand, became more important in more northern latitudes when seasonal agriculture was practiced. As the Roman Empire moved northward, it centered its activity calendar on the solar year for the most part.


The Egyptians developed a municipal calendar with 12 months of 30 days and five days added to approximate the solar year centuries before the Roman Empire. The appearance of specific groups of stars known as decans marked each ten-day cycle. Twelve decans may be seen crossing the heavens with the rise of the star Sirius shortly before daybreak, which happened around the all-important yearly flooding of the Nile. The Egyptians developed a system in which each interval of darkness (and later, each interval of daylight) was split into a dozen equal pieces due to the cosmic significance they ascribed to the 12 decans. Because the length of these durations varied with the changing length of days and nights as the seasons passed, they were dubbed temporal hours. Summer hours were long, winter hours were short; the hours of daylight and darkness were only equal at the spring and fall equinoxes. Temporal hours, which were first adopted by the Greeks and later spread over Europe by the Romans, were in use for over 2, 500 years.

Sundials, which indicate time by the length or direction of the sun's shadow, were invented to track temporal hours during the day. The water clock, the sundial's equivalent, was created to keep track of the hours of the night. A basin with a small hole towards the bottom through which the water dripped out was one of the early water clocks. As the water level dropped below the hour lines inscribed on the inner surface, it signalled the passing of an hour. Although these gadgets worked well in the Mediterranean, they couldn't always be relied on in northern Europe's foggy and often chilly weather.

The mechanical clock's introduction meant that, while it could be altered to keep temporal hours, it was more suited to keeping equal ones. However, the dilemma of when to start counting arose as a result of these developments, and several systems emerged in the early 14th century. The strategies for dividing the day into 24 equal halves differed depending on when the count began: Italian hours started at sunset, Babylonian hours at sunrise, astronomical hours at noon, and 'great clock' hours at midnight, which were employed for several huge public clocks in Germany. These were eventually replaced by the small clock,' or French, hours, which divided the day into two 12-hour sections, beginning at midnight.

The first known weight-driven mechanical clock was constructed in Bedfordshire, England, in 1283. It was the escapement, not the descending weight that generated the motive force or the gear wheels (which had been there for at least 1, 300 years) that transferred the power, that made this new timekeeper revolutionary. In the early 1400s, the coiled spring or fusee was invented, which provided a consistent force to the timekeeper's gear wheels despite the changing tension of its mainspring. A pendulum clock had been invented by the 16th century, but the pendulum swung in a broad arc, making it inefficient.

In England, in 1670, a modification on the original escapement was devised to address this. The anchor escapement, which was a lever-based device shaped like a ship's anchor, was the name of the device. The mechanism is rocked by the action of a pendulum, which captures and then releases each tooth of the escape wheel, allowing it to turn a precise amount. The anchor escapement, unlike the original version used in early pendulum clocks, allowed the pendulum to traverse in a relatively narrow arc. Furthermore, this invention enabled the use of a lengthy pendulum capable of beating once per second, resulting in the creation of a new floor-standing case form known as the grandfather clock.

Most electrical devices now use highly accurate timekeeping instruments to set the beat. A quartz-crystal clock is used to regulate the operation of nearly all computers. Furthermore, time signals from GPS satellites not only calibrate the functions of precise navigation equipment, but also do so for mobile phones, real-time stock trading systems, and nationwide power distribution grids. These time-based technologies have become so ingrained in our daily lives that we only realize how reliant we are on them when they fail.

Question (1-8)

Complete the table below 

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Time Keeping 

 Facts

Babylonians began to measure time at least 1_____________ ago, long before the Roman Empire

Their calendars were based on three natural cycles:2________ which is defined by successive periods of light and darkness as the earth rotates on its axis; the 3__________, which follows the phases of the moon as it orbits the earth; and the 4_________ which is defined by the changing seasons that accompany our planet's revolution around the sun. 

The Egyptians developed a municipal calendar with 5_______________  added to approximate the solar year centuries before the Roman Empire The appearance of specific groups of stars known as 6________ marked each ten-day cycle
Temporal hours, which were first adopted by the Greeks and later spread over Europe by the Romans, were in use for over 7________ The first known weight-driven mechanical clock was constructed in 8________, England, in 1283.

Check answer for this exercise

 Attempt this free IELTS academic reading table completion mock test

 

IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 3 

Answer the question 1-6 which are based on the reading passage below

Alzheimer

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain illness that has no cure. It leads to a gradual loss of memory and intellectual skills, followed by physiological functions. It's a specific sort of dementia. The term "dementia" does not refer to a specific condition. It causes memory loss as well as the inability to talk or carry out daily tasks.Another type of dementia is stroke. Some of these brain abnormalities can be treated with drugs. They may help to alleviate symptoms or reduce the progression of the condition. Alzheimer's disease is more common in adults over the age of 60. It's possible that having a family member who has had it puts you at a higher risk. The majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over sixty-five years old, although roughly 200,000 younger Americans suffer from the disease. The signs and symptoms worsen over time. Memory loss is usually modest at first. Memory loss is fairly severe in its later stages. People are unable to communicate. In the United States, Alzheimer's disease is the sixth largest cause of death. Those with the disease live an average of eight years after the first symptoms occur. The range, however, is four to twenty years. The hunt for a cure for this condition is still ongoing. Threesome drugs can deal with the symptoms or delay the progression of the condition. Some brain activities slow down as people age, causing difficulty thinking rapidly or recalling specific information. Serious forgetfulness and a loss of ability to reason, on the other hand, could indicate that brain cells are deteriorating. Alzheimer's disease typically originates in the learning center of the brain. As the condition worsens, mood swings, confusion, and disorientation emerge. Speaking, swallowing, and walking difficulties, as well as mistaken assumptions about those around the sufferer, can occur. Unfortunately, the patient may not even be aware that there is an issue. Changes in the family may be noticed by family members. The patient may benefit from early detection and diagnosis. One hundred billion nerve cells make up the brain. Special functions are assigned to groups of cells.

Everyone communicates with one another. All processes must be able to communicate with one another. Alzheimer's disease, according to scientists, hinders the cells from functioning as they should. The cells suffer damage, lose their capacity to fulfill their functions, and eventually perish. Plaques are protein fragment deposits that form between cells. Tangles are twisted protein filaments that accumulate inside cells. Most people develop plaques and tangles as they get older. Autopsies of persons who have died from Alzheimer's disease, on the other hand, reveal higher levels of these two proteins. The issue starts in the memory-related part of the brain. Scientists believe that the buildup of these proteins hinders cells from communicating with one another. The loss of function associated with Alzheimer's disease is caused by the destruction of nerve cells.

Question(1-6) 

Complete the table below

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Alzheimer's

Problems

Dementia refers to 

1_____________ as well as the inability to talk or carry out daily tasks

Another type of Dementia is 2___________ Brain abnormalities can be treated with drugs, may help to alleviate symptoms or reduce the progression of the condition
The majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over sixty-five years old, although roughly 3___________ Americans suffer from the disease Memory loss is usually modest at first. Memory loss is fairly severe in its later stages. People are unable to communicate
4____________ make up the brain special functions are allotted to group cell which help everyone to communicate with each other 5______________ and 6____________ are made up of protein filaments accumulate inside the cells.

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IELTS academic reading table completion practice question 4

Answer the question 1-6 which are based on the reading passage below

Autumn leaves

The changing of the leaves in the fall is one of the most mesmerizing natural occurrences of the year in many parts of North America. The hues are breathtaking, but scientists have long been baffled as to why certain trees turn yellow or orange while others become crimson or purple.

Summer leaves are green because chlorophyll, a chemical that absorbs sunlight and turns it into new building components for the tree, is abundant. The amount of solar energy accessible in the northern hemisphere decreases dramatically as autumn approaches. The ideal method for many trees, except evergreen conifers, is to postpone photosynthesis until the spring. 

As a result, rather than keeping the now-defunct leaves throughout the winter, the tree saves its valuable resources and discards them. However, before releasing go of its leaves, the tree dismantles its chlorophyll molecules and returns the nitrogen to the twigs. Other hues that have been dominated by chlorophyll throughout the summer begin to emerge when chlorophyll depletes. The autumn colors of yellow and orange are explained by this unmasking, but not the spectacular reds and purples of trees like maple and sumac.

The source of the red is well known: anthocyanins, water-soluble plant pigments that reflect the visible spectrum's red to blue range. They're part of the flavonoids family of sugar-based chemical substances. What's strange is that anthocyanins are brand new, produced in the leaves just as the tree is about to drop them. But the production of anthocyanins is perplexing: why would a tree bother creating new chemicals in its leaves when it's already scrambling to remove and protect the ones that are already there?

Some hypotheses about anthocyanins claim that they work as a chemical defense against insect or fungal attacks, that they attract fruit-eating birds, or that they boost a leaf's freezing tolerance. However, each of these hypotheses has flaws, such as the fact that leaves become red for such a brief period that the cost of energy required to synthesize anthocyanins would outweigh any antifungal or anti-herbivore activity. Photosynthesis is the process of turning sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into new material.

It's also been suggested that trees emit vibrant red colors to persuade herbivorous insects that they're healthy and robust and that they'll be able to mount chemical defenses against invasion readily. If insects were to pay heed to such adverts, they might be enticed to lay their eggs on a less attractive, and thus less resistant, host. The issue in this theory is the absence of evidence to back it up. No one knows if more vigorous trees have the brightest leaves or whether insects choose their food based on color intensity.

The 'light screen' idea is one of the more reasonable explanations for why leaves would go to the trouble of producing anthocyanins when they're busy packing up for the winter. The rationale behind this argument is that the red pigment is produced in autumn leaves to protect chlorophyll, a light-absorbing molecule, from excessive light. When chlorophyll is the world's most powerful light absorber, why does it need to be protected? Why should chlorophyll be protected at a time when the tree is destroying it to salvage as much as possible

Even while chlorophyll has been precisely designed to collect the energy of sunshine, it can be overwhelmed by it at times, particularly in droughts, cold temperatures, or nutrient deficiencies. Furthermore, the problem of oversensitivity to light is exacerbated in the fall, when the leaf is busy deconstructing its internal machinery in preparation for the winter. In an intact summer leaf, the energy received by the chlorophyll molecules is quickly directed into useful products and processes. The oxygen generated by the stimulated chlorophyll molecules makes the weaker fall leaf subject to the very damaging impacts of the oxygen.

Even if you had no idea what was going on as the leaves turned crimson, there are hints everywhere. One is obvious: on many trees, the reddest leaves are on the side of the tree that receives the most sunlight. Not only that, but the crimson on the upper side of the leaf is brighter. For decades, it has also been known that the greatest conditions for bright red colours are dry, sunny days and cool nights, which are similar to the conditions that make leaves vulnerable to excessive light. Finally, as you journey north in the northern hemisphere, trees such as maples become considerably redder. It's cooler there, they're more stressed, their chlorophyll is more sensitive, and more sunscreen is required.

What isn't clear is why some trees produce red pigments while others don't, revealing their orange or yellow hues instead. Is there any alternative way for these trees to avoid overexposure to light in the autumn? Their story, while not as visually stunning, will undoubtedly be just as delicate and intricate.

Question(1-6)

Complete the table below

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Season

Statements

Summer leaves are because 1__________  a chemical that absorbs sunlight and turns it into new building components for the tree, is abundant

The source of the red is well known 2____________ water-soluble plant pigments that reflect the visible spectrum's red to blue range

Leaves become red for such a brief period that the cost of energy required to synthesize anthocyanins would outweigh any 3__________ activity. 4______________ is the process of turning sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into new material

Trees emit vibrant red colour to persuade 5____________ insects

The 6____________ idea is one of the more reasonable explanations for why leaves would go to the trouble of producing anthocyanins when they're busy packing up for the winter

Check answer for this exercise

 

Answers for practice questions

  • Answer for practice question-1

Biometrics

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1. China
2. Fingerprinting

Explanation:  In the 14th Century, China practiced biometrics in the form of fingerprinting.

3. Late
4. Photographic memory

Explanation: Until the late 1800s, identification was primarily based on 'photographic memory.' 

5. 1903 

Explanation: Until 1903, when two identical measurements were recorded for two separate people at Fort Leavenworth Prison, this system was frequently used by police authorities. 

  • Answer for practice question-2

Chronicle of Timekeeping 

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.5000 Years ago

Explanation:  Archaeological evidence, the Babylonians began to measure time at least 5,000 years ago, long before the Roman Empire

2.Solar day
3.Lunar month
4.Solar year

Explanation for answer 2,3,4: Their calendars were based on three natural cycles: the solar day, which is defined by successive periods of light and darkness as the earth rotates on its axis; the lunar month, which follows the phases of the moon as it orbits the earth; and the solar year, which is defined by the changing seasons that accompany our planet's revolution around the sun

5.12 months of 30 days and five days

Explanation: The Egyptians developed a municipal calendar with 12 months of 30 days and five days added to approximate the solar year centuries before the Roman Empire

6.decans

Explanation:  Twelve decans may be seen crossing the heavens with the rise of the star Sirius shortly before daybreak, which happened around the all-important yearly flooding of the Nile

7.2,500 Years

Explanation: Temporal hours, which were first adopted by the Greeks and later spread over Europe by the Romans, were in use for over 2,500 years

8.Bedfordshire

Explanation:  The first known weight-driven mechanical clock was constructed in Bedfordshire, England, in 1283

  • Answer for practice question-3

Alzheimer

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.Memory loss

Explanation:  "dementia" does not refer to a specific condition but It causes memory loss as well as the inability to talk or carry out daily tasks.

2.Stroke

Explanation: Blocked artery or bursting of a blood vessel is another type of dementia

3.200,000 young

Explanation: The majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over sixty-five years old, although roughly 200,000 younger Americans suffer from the disease

4.One hundred million nerve cell

Explanation: One hundred billion nerve cells make up the brain. Special functions are assigned to groups of cells

5.Plaques
6.Tangles

Explanation for questions 5,6: Plaques are protein fragment deposits that form between cells. Tangles are twisted protein filaments that accumulate inside cells. Most people develop plaques and tangles as they get older

  • Answer for practice question-4

Autumn Leaves

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.Chlorophyll

Explanation: Chlorophyll a chemical that absorbs sunlight and turns it into new building components for the tree, is abundant

2.anthocyanins

Explanation: anthocyanins, water-soluble plant pigments that reflect the visible spectrum's red to the blue range. They're part of the flavonoids family of sugar-based chemical substances

3.antifungal or anti-herbivore activity

Explanation: Leaves become red for such a brief period that the cost of energy required to synthesize anthocyanins would outweigh any antifungal or anti-herbivore activity

4.photosynthesis

Explanation: Photosynthesis is the process of turning sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into new material.

5.Herbivorous

Explanation: herbivorous insects that they're healthy and robust and that they'll be able to mount chemical defenses against invasion readily

6.Light Screen

Explanation: The 'light screen' idea is one of the more reasonable explanations for why leaves would go to the trouble of producing anthocyanins when they're busy packing up for the winter

 

Also check IELTS academic reading table completion tips 

 

IELTS academic reading table completion question list for practice

Answer the question 1-6 which are based on the reading passage below

Tuning up your Leadership Skills

Leadership is important both in the workplace and in society. Leading a group of people towards a common goal is not a simple thing. Being in the position of leader, one needs to have several skills to justify that position. Some important skills are there to develop oneself as an effective leader. 

Communication is the first and foremost important leadership skill. Without clear communication, organisations or communities will lose direction. Being able to communicate clearly is the way to give a proper direction to the people. Motivation is another important skill for a leader. As a leader, one needs to motivate and encourage the employers to work and produce. If no one is there to inspire and motivate, employers will get bored and lose interest in work and in company. Delegation is a way to assign duties to their respective employers based on their skillset. By delegating, leaders can focus on some important tasks. Positive attitude is vital to the leader. If the leader is being in a positive attitude, workers will also enjoy their work and can put an effort into their work. Leaders should have to be creative to solve problems. Employers will also be inspired by the leader’s ability to think creatively. Leaders should give proper feedback to their team members in order to enhance their performance. 

Question 1-6

Complete the table below

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the passage for each answer.

Skills

Importance/Benefits

Communication

It will give a 1______ to the employers.

2________ Employers will not get bored and lose interest in work.
Delegation Leaders can focus on 3______ tasks by delegating
Positive Attitude Workers will 4_____ their work and can put effort into their work.
Creative thinking Employers will be 5_______ by the leader’s creativity.
Feedback  Giving feedback enhances the 6______ of the team members.
Answer

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1. direction

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - Being able to communicate clearly is the way to give a proper direction to the people. 

2. Motivation

Explanation: Paragraph 2 -  Motivation is another important skill for a leader. As a leader, one needs to motivate and encourage the employers to work and produce. If no one is there to inspire and motivate, employers will get bored and lose interest in work and in company.

3. important (or) some important

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - Delegation is a way to assign duties to their respective employers based on their skillset. By delegating, leaders can focus on some important tasks.

4. enjoy

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - Positive attitude is vital to the leader. If the leader is being in a positive attitude, workers will also enjoy their work and can put an effort into their work. 

5. inspired

Explanation: Paragraph 2 -  Leaders should have to be creative to solve problems. Employers will also be inspired by the leader’s ability to think creatively. 

6. performance

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - Leaders should give proper feedback to their team members in order to enhance their performance.

Conclusion

Hope these practice questions in this article helps to increase your potential in answering table completion. Moreover, these practice questions help you to score effectively in the IELTS reading section.

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Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

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About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.