IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers

  • By Kanan Team
  • kanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-facebookkanan-ftr-linkedinkanan-ftr

Table of contents

  1. IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers
  2. 3 2022 IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers
  3. Matching sentence endings - Exercise 1
  4. Matching sentence endings - Exercise 2
  5. Matching sentence endings - Exercise 3
  6. Conclusion

Matching sentence endings questions appear to check your grammatical accuracy, grasping power, and logical thinking. In this task, you will find two lists, one is a list of incomplete sentences and the other is a list of possible endings. Your work is to find the possible endings from the given different options based on the passage. Find three IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers in this blog for your practice purpose.

Compared to other IELTS general reading question types, matching sentence endings is one of the most significant question types. So, start practicing all three given IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers to attain a high IELTS general reading score in the IELTS exams. 

3 2022 IELTS general reading matching sentence endings exercises with answers 

Before going down for the exercises, you need to know some tips to solve this question type effectively. Pay attention to the given instructions first. Then, read the passage to understand the meaning. Now, come to the question and read it twice to get the point. Predict the ending that suits the sentence. Using keywords choose the possible endings from the given options based on the passage. 

Also, read IELTS general reading tips

Matching sentence endings - Exercise 1

Answer questions 1- 5 which are based on the reading passage below.

Talking point

Knowing a second language energises children’s cleverness and makes their career opportunities more optimistic. But the truth is, in New Zealand, speakers of two or more languages are in the minority, like in many other English-speaking countries. 84% of New Zealanders speak only one language. This goes to a small number who claim to talk two or more languages - a small percentage of whom were born in New Zealand.

No matter how proud people are of their cultural language, to speak any language other than English makes a difference here. That’s why 80-year-old Tiffany Dvorak no longer desires to speak her mother language, German, and 80-year-old Ani Powell is ashamed when people comment on the fact that she is able to speak Maori *. As Joanne Powell, Ani’s mother points out: ‘In Europe, it’s not uncommon for kids to be bilingual. There are some people in New Zealand who think that if you speak a different language to your kids, you are not allowing them to become members of the community.

But in reality, the general agreement among professionals is that knowing a second language is useful for children. Specialists accept that bilinguals - people who speak two languages - have a clear understanding benefit over their monolingual schoolmates. This relies on how much of each language they can speak, not on which language is used, so it doesn’t matter whether they are discovering Maori or German or Chinese, or any other language. 

Cathie Elder, a professor of Language Teaching and Learning at Auckland University, says, ‘A lot of analyses have shown that children who speak more than one language sometimes learn one language more slowly, but in the end, they do as well as their monolingual schoolmates, and usually better, in other subjects. The view is that there is an improvement in general brightness from the struggle of discovering another language.’

Bilinguals also show greater creativity and problem-solving capability, and they learn further languages more efficiently.’ So with all of the advantages, why do we not show more confidence in learning other languages? Parents and teachers involved in bilingual education say stress from friends at school, general perspectives of other languages in English-speaking countries, and issues in the school system are to blame.

Questions 1-5

Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A–G, below.
Write the correct letter, A-G, as your answer to each question. 

1.  In New Zealand, speakers of two or more languages are in the minority, like in 

2.  Eighty four percent of New Zealanders 

3.  Tiffany Dvorak no longer desires 

4.  The general agreement among professionals is that knowing 

5. Bilinguals also show greater creativity and problem-solving capability, and 

  1. they learn further languages more efficiently.
  2. many other English-speaking countries
  3. to speak her mother language
  4.  in the school system are to blame
  5. a second language is useful for children
  6. speak only one language
  7. discovering another language
Answers for exercise 1

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1. B

Explanation: Paragraph 1 - But the truth is, in New Zealand, speakers of two or more languages are in the minority, like in many other English-speaking countries. 

2. F

Explanation: Paragraph 1 - 84% of New Zealanders speak only one language. 

3. C 

Explanation: Paragraph 2 -  That’s why 80-year-old Tiffany Dvorak no longer desires to speak her mother language, German, and 80-year-old Ani Powell is ashamed when people comment on the fact that she is able to speak Maori *. 

4. E 

Explanation: Paragraph 3- But in reality, the general agreement among professionals is that knowing a second language is useful for children. 

5. A

Explanation: Paragraph 5 -  Bilinguals also show greater creativity and problem-solving capability, and they learn further languages more efficiently.’

Check more IELTS general reading matching sentence endings practice questions 

Matching sentence endings - Exercise 2

Answer questions 1- 5 which are based on the reading passage below.

Paper recycling

Paper is different from other waste products in that it is derived from a renewable resource, trees, unlike the minerals and oil used in the production of plastics and metals, may be replaced. Paper is also biodegradable, so when it is disposed of, it does not represent as much harm to the environment. While waste paper accounts for 45 of every 100 tonnes of the wood fibre used to make paper in Australia, the rest is sourced straight from forests and plantations. This is a good outcome by global standards, given that the global average is 33% waste paper.

Governments have pushed for waste paper collection and sorting schedules, while the paper industry has reacted by creating creative recycling technologies that have prepared the way for even more use of old fibre. As a result, the usage of recycled fibres in the industry is expected to increase at twice the rate of virgin fibre over the next few years.

The waste paper already accounts for 70% of packaging paper, and developments in the technology essential to remove ink from paper have let newsprint and writing paper have a higher recycled percentage. The community must participate in order to reap the benefits of recycling. Accept that the quality of paper items may change; for example, stationery may become less white and have a rougher feel. Community support is also needed for waste paper collection programs. We need to divide the paper into various types and filter it from impurities like staples, paperclips, twine, and other materials, in addition to making it open to collectors.

The amount of paper that can be recycled is limited by technical limits, and some paper products cannot be collected for re-use. Paper in the form of books and permanent documents, photographic paper, and heavily polluted paper are among them. Factory and retail stores, which collect enormous amounts of packaging material in which goods are delivered, offices, which have unwanted business documents and computer output, paper converters, and printers, and households, which discard newspapers and packaging material, are the four most common sources of paper for recycling. The paper manufacturer pays for the paper and may also be responsible for the collection costs.

After being collected, the paper must be sorted by hand by persons who have been trained to identify different types of paper. Because some forms of paper can only be made from specific types of recycled fibre, this is required. The sorted paper must next be repulped or combined with water in order to be broken down into individual fibres. This mixture is known as stock, and it can contain a wide range of contaminants, especially if it's generated from mixed waste paper that hasn't been sorted. Other materials are removed from the stock using a type of machine.

Because the printing ink has seeped into the individual fibres, the fibres from printed waste paper are grey after going through the repulping process. This recycled material can only be used in goods where the grey colour does not matter, such as cardboard boxes, however, the fibres must be de-inked if the grey colour is unacceptable. Chemicals like caustic soda or other alkalis, soaps and detergents, water-hardening agents like calcium chloride, foaming agents, and bleaching agents are all used in this process. The recycled fibres must be refined or treated in order to join together before they can be produced into paper.

Questions 1-5

Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A–G, below.
Write the correct letter, A-G, as your answer to each question. 

1. Paper is different from other waste products in that it is derived from a renewable resource, trees, unlike the minerals and oil used 

2. Paper is also biodegradable, so when it is disposed of, it does not 

3. The usage of recycled fibres in the industry is expected to increase at twice the rate of 

4. The community must participate in order 

5. The recycled fibres must be refined or treated in order to join together 

  1. represent as much harm to the environment. 
  2. before they can be produced into paper
  3. to reap the benefits of recycling
  4. be responsible for the collection costs
  5. in the production of plastics and metals, may be replaced
  6. virgin fibre over the next few years
  7. from the stock using a type of machine
Answers for exercise 2

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1. E

Explanation: Paragraph 1 - Paper is different from other waste products in that it is derived from a renewable resource, trees, unlike the minerals and oil used in the production of plastics and metals, may be replaced. 

2. A.

Explanation: Paragraph 1 - Paper is also biodegradable, so when it is disposed of, it does not represent as much harm to the environment.

3. F

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - As a result, the usage of recycled fibres in the industry is expected to increase at twice the rate of virgin fibre over the next few years.

4. C

Explanation: Paragraph 3 - The community must participate in order to reap the benefits of recycling. 

5. B 

Explanation: Paragraph 6 - The recycled fibres must be refined or treated in order to join together before they can be produced into paper.

Attempt this free IELTS general reading matching sentence endings mock test 

Matching sentence endings - Exercise 3

Answer questions 1- 5 which are based on the reading passage below.

Advice for immigrants

As an immigrant to North America, you must guarantee that your international qualifications are appropriately recognised by employers and organisations such as colleges and universities. These could be trade certificates, but they could also be educational credentials like degrees or diplomas that you have achieved or are working on.

It's usual for hiring managers to have little or no experience evaluating academic credentials gained outside of North America. Employers, on the other hand, value formal education when making recruiting decisions. Although education is a need for 60% of job openings, 40% of human resources employees claim that if they don't know much about the worth of documents obtained elsewhere, they won't recognise them.

According to research, immigrants sometimes start with a lesser wage than persons who have completed their training in North America. You might want to apply for jobs with organisations whose employees are familiar with your predicament or, more significantly, who know where to send you to obtain your North American credentials. Apprenticeships leading to skilled trades are in high demand if you need to finish your training in North America.

Apprenticeship training is a hands-on program that includes around 10% classroom instruction at community colleges and 90% on-the-job training. Working for an employer and earning money during the training term is part of the training. There is sometimes a five-year training limit. This training may be applied to college or university credits or education. After completing apprenticeship training, there is a significant chance of long-term work security.

If you earned your papers outside of North America, you will need to have them translated to work or study in the United States. When applying for jobs, your education must be evaluated by an accredited assessment provider, especially if the job description specifies an education need. It is also suggested that you attach a copy of the report to your cover letter. It is recommended that you offer this information ahead of time, rather than waiting until you meet with the employer. 

Getting a job interview accounts for more than half of the job-search process; and with an evaluation report, you want to make sure that companies are screening you 'in' rather than 'out.' Although establishing a business in North America is tough, corporations do believe that integrating immigrants into the workforce is beneficial to the workplace mosaic. Employers are making great strides in improving workplace diversity.

Questions 1-5

Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A–G, below.
Write the correct letter, A-G, as your answer to each question. 

1. Immigrants are sometimes paid less than people who have 

2. Part of the training includes working for an employer and 

3.  If you earned your papers outside of North America, you'll need to have them translated 

4. More than half of the job-search process is

5. Employers are making significant progress in 

  1. boosting diversity in the workplace
  2. spent obtaining a job interview
  3. finish your training in North America
  4. earning money during the training period
  5. before you may work or study in the US
  6. completed their education in North America
  7. significant chance of long-term work security
Answers for exercise 3

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in the regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1. C 

Explanation: According to research, immigrants sometimes start with a lesser wage than persons who have completed their training in North America.

2. D 

Explanation: Working for an employer and earning money during the training term is part of the training.

3. E

Explanation: If you earned your papers outside of North America, you will need to have them translated to work or study in the United States.

2. F 

Explanation: Getting a job interview accounts for more than half of the job-search process; 

4. A 

Explanation:  Employers are making great strides in improving workplace diversity.

Also, check IELTS general reading matching sentence endings tips

Conclusion

Practicing several exercises allows you to understand the test format and also helps you to develop a wide range of reading skills. Try to answer all the exercises given in this blog. This will definitely help you to score well in your final IELTS exams. 

Kanan Blog

The latest tips and news from Kanan International team

4

Making your study abroad planning exciting, bright and way more easier.

Sign up for a free 30-minute consultation

study abroad consulation

Making your study abroad planning exciting, bright and way more easier.

Sign up for a free 30-minute consultation

study abroad consulation

Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

229, Yonge Street Suite 450 Toronto Ontario, Canada M5B 1N9

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017. Ph: +91 73051 21113

kanan-ftr-phone+91 63570 12000

kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

kanan-ftr-fbkanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-youtube

About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

kanan-ftr-logo

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.

Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

229, Yonge Street Suite 450 Toronto Ontario, Canada M5B 1N9

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

kanan-ftr-phone+91 63597 73959

kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

kanan-ftr-fbkanan-ftr-twitterkanan-ftr-youtube

Locations

Navsari|Ahmedabad|Surat|Vadodara|Vallabh VidyanagarChennai|Dehradun|Vapi|Nadiad|Thrissur|Karnal|Indore|Bardoli

About Kanan International

A truly global higher education partner to learners and education institutions. Supports learners at every point in their global education journey with its reliable services, products and solutions.

Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.