IELTS academic reading matching features

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Table of Contents

  1. IELTS academic reading matching features
  2. IELTS academic reading matching features - Strategies & tips to solve
  3. Common problems faced by students in matching features
  4. Skills required to solve matching features
  5. Matching features skill building exercise 1
  6. Matching features skill building exercise 2
  7. Matching features skill building exercise 3
  8. Answers for skill building exercises
  9. Conclusion

This IELTS academic reading matching features question type requires you to match pieces of information (opinions, findings, facts) with the correct person or feature or period. The questions are based on the passage that has been provided.

In this question type, you must match a list of possibilities with the appropriate set of statements. In most cases, these options are either features or names mentioned in the reading passage.

This is one of the important questions in IELTS academic reading question types. Here we provide the tips and exercises which supports you to solve IELTS academic reading matching features so that you can learn and score an 8+ band score in your IELTS academic reading section  

IELTS academic reading matching features - Strategies & tips to solve

Below you’ll find IELTS academic reading matching features, tips and strategies given by IELTS experts. These 9 tips will help you to develop your confidence in answering this question type.

  • This question type requires matching pieces of information (opinions, findings, facts) with the correct person or feature or period.
  • The questions will obviously NOT be in progressive order, so don't search in that manner. They may be scattered across the entire passage.
  • Names of people and places are written in capitals. These are easy to spot. Read the names on the list and begin locating them. After the first reference to a person with the full name, the surname or pronouns such as - he, she etc. are used.
  • Look for quotes and reporting verbs such as, says, asserts, mentions, agrees, disagrees or expressions such as According to ...'. These words will quickly guide you to the required information.
  • The statements in the question set are paraphrased from the text using synonyms or restructuring. Do not be misguided by words picked up from the text. These are meant to confuse you. Match the interpretation and not words in isolation. 
  • Dont waste time in thinking about minor details that you know already
  • Look over the passage line by line for keywords. You know what you’re looking for and why you’re looking for it, therefore you can find the answers in the paragraph.
  • Primarily try underlining the keywords found in the passage to gain a better grasp of the overall meaning of the reading text.
  • Don't expect the answers to be in progressive order. Thus you have to scan the entire passage to locate the answer.


These IELTS academic reading matching features, tips and strategies can help you to answer questions with a minimum effort.  Kindly take note of the fundamental ideas from the tips to solve matching features effectively.

Common problems faced by students in matching features 

  • Due to a lack of understanding, students struggled to identify the meaning of the given phrases.
  • As a basic rule, reading the entire paragraph word by word is not necessary and actually time-consuming, so employ the scanning approach.
  • Being in a hurry while matching the features.
  • Focusing on finding the exact words.

Skills required to solve matching features 

  • Passage understanding
  • Skimming
  • Paraphrasing
  • Strong vocabulary


Also read: IELTS academic reading tips

Matching features skill building exercise 1 

Answer questions 1-7 which are based on the reading passage below.

OBJECTS FROM DIFFERENT CIVILIZATIONS

Objects from lost civilisations can tell us about the social relationships and the way of life of the people belonging to those societies. The Indus valley civilisation and the Chinese civilisation have been influential with their innovations and contributions to advanced technology. The Indus Valley civilization is also called the Harappan civilization. Developing along the mighty Indus River, it was at its peak around 2500 and 3500 BC. This Bronze Age civilisation is believed to be among the oldest world civilisations together with the Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilisations. The famous figurine of the dancing girl from the Harappa region shows the advances made in art and metallurgy at the time. The statue describes details such as the hairstyle and ornaments prevalent then such as the more than 20 bangles in her left arm and four on her right arm, and the necklace. Although the bronze statuette is in standing position, it was named the dancing girl by assuming that it was her profession. 

The seals are other famous objects from the Bronze Age. Seals are beautifully carved out of stone and then fired for durability. Over 3,500 seals discovered are mostly square with different symbols at the top, an animal in the centre and a few more symbols at the bottom are, which are presumed to be the inscription of the Indus valley language. The inscription indicates that people of this age wrote the first line from right to left, the second line from left to right and so on. Some common animal inscriptions on these seals include elephants, unicorns, rhinoceros, and bulls. On the reverse face, most seals have projections with a hole to possibly carry it comfortably. The imprint on some of the seals suggests that they were used as clay tags for sacks of traded goods such as grain, which means that the Harappan people were involved in long-distance trading networks. Hunting tools show that the Indus people were fond of game. Many of the toys are carts and animals made from baked clay, and most were for children, which has led to the conclusion that the people had an active social life. 

Standardised measurement is another valuable contribution of the Indus valley people. The oldest ruler with markings was a copper alloy rod found by a German archaeologist and he claims that it was used as a standard measurement unit. He mentions that the measurements on the ruler are divided into units that correspond to 1.32 inches which are further divided into perfectly calculated decimal subdivisions. Measurements of the bricks found in excavations of the Mohenjo Daro and Harappan civilisations match with those on the ruler mentioned by the German archaeologist. 

China was the first nation to invent paper. In the older civilisations, words were written on natural materials such as grass stalks, earthen plates, wood and bamboo strips, tree leaves, and sheepskins. The first paper from the Chinese people was known as bo and was made of silk. However, it was expensive. In the 2nd century, a new kind of paper was produced from rags, bark, wheat stalks, and other materials, which was not only cheaper but was also durable and could be used for brush writing. Papermaking had spread to other parts of the world in the beginning of the third century. Ancient China also gets credit for the invention of gunpowder. In a collection of most important military techniques as described in Wujing Zongyao that was edited in 1044 by Zeng Gong Liang, three formulas of making gunpowder were discovered and have been described as the earliest formulas of such kinds. Another significant gift from China was the compass. It was developed after some miners got hold of a piece of a natural magnetite that attracted iron and pointed north. The compass that we use today is a result of a series of improvements to the earliest design. Before it was invented, navigators depended on the position of the moon, sun, and the polestar for their bearings. 

Questions 1-7

The reading passage mentions a number of objects/achievements related to Indus Valley and Chinese civilisations and their relevance.

Match each object/ achievement (Questions 1-7) in List A with its relevance (A-J) in List B.

Write the correct letter, A-J, as your answer.

List A

1 figurine of the dancing girl 

2 seals for marking goods

3 weapons for hunting

4 toys for children

5 copper alloy ruler

6 production of paper from plant material

7 invention of the compass

List B

A strength and affordability of a product

B the various uses of clay

C spread of commerce in a wide area

D advancements in metal craft

E recognition of dance as a profession

F social activity

G a consequence of the discovery of natural magnet

H  navigators depended on astronomical bodies

I use of standard measurements in construction

J the consumption of wild birds and animals as food

Check answer for this exercise 

Check more IELTS academic reading matching features exercise with answers

Matching features skill building exercise 2

Answer questions 1-5 which are based on the reading passage below.

Why can't we live forever?

The only certainties in life, said Benjamin Franklin, are death and taxes. Don't expect eithe to disappear anytime soon. The prospects for a longer life currently seem rosy, at least if yo, are a laboratory mouse. This year has seen headlines about mice, engineered to produce lots of antioxidants, who can live 20 percent longer than usual, and equally impressive gain for animals altered to produce high levels of a peptide hormone known as Klotho (after the minor Greek deity). Ultra-low-calorie diets, big doses of vitamin E, and even transferring ovaries from a younger mouse into elderly females also seem to extend lifespan. Shepherds may say that sheep are just looking for new ways to die, but mice seem to be susceptible to almost anything that can make them live a bit longer.

So what are the prospects for a rather larger mammal that normally lives 70-80 years, and very occasionally makes it to 120 before keeling over? Will, what works in mice, work in humans?

There are well-publicised optimists who think it will. The most often quoted is Aubrey de Grey of Cambridge, a proponent of a big expansion of research on what he has called Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence. He is also one of the leading lights of the Methuselah Mouse Prize, which is offered to the scientific team that develops the longest lived mouse.

But for all his energy and revolutionary zeal, Professor de Grey is not actually doing the research - his day job is as a computer expert in a genetics lab. And many researchers in biogerontology are sceptical about his predictions. That scepticism came through recently when Tom Kirkwood of the University of Newcastle's Institute for Ageing and Health asked in Nature: “Why must advocates of life extension make preposterous claims about imminent longevity gains if they are to gain public notice?"

Professor Kirkwood is the author of the influential 'disposable soma’ theory of ageing that states the body decays because there is little genetic interest in keeping it going beyond reproductive age. This means that he sees no programmed limit to lifespan, in mice or people. Ageing is a biological sin of omission, not commission. So perhaps we could block whatever is doing the damage. But, he stresses, “This does not imply that major increases in lifespan are imminent. As we grow older , the accumulated burden of molecular and cellular damage increases and the going gets harder."

Others in the field tend to agree. One reason is simply that ageing is very complex, and e do not know enough to make sensible predictions. Caleb Finch of the University of Southern California says: “I have a simple view: we don't know what we don't know about egeing processes. So, what can be said on future longevity?"

Linda Partridge of University College London's Centre for Research on Ageing, well known for work on fruit flies, backs Professor Kirkwood. In any case, she adds, "I think that we should be working to promote health during ageing rather than on increases in lifespan per et." Either way, she believes that “Progress will be gradual and based on existing promising areas of work, rather than based on unproven approaches”.

Her colleague David Gems, who works on nematode worms, is optimistic that the basic biology of ageing will be understood in the next decade or two. But he stresses that how easily this translates into treating or preventing ageing-related diseases depends on what ageing really turns out to be: "There's a huge margin of uncertainty." He suggests that cancer treatments are a better historical guide than, say, antibiotics - and most cancers femain incurable.

Martin Brand of the Medical Research Council's Dunn Human Nutrition Unit in Cambridge also urges caution. "There have been spectacular increases in lifespan caused by simple treatments and mutations in model organisms," he concedes. But he is mindful that flies and mice in the laboratory tend to live shorter lives than wild strains. "I worry that these results can be explained as putting right bad husbandry of the model organisms rather than affecting ageing itself.”

Questions 1-5

Look at the following statements and the list of people below.

Match each statement with the correct person.

NB - You may use any answer more than once.

1. The condition of the body starts to decline when we can't have offspring. 

2.Only two things are predictable in life.

3. Living longer is less important than how healthy we are as we age.

4.People make ridiculous statements about how long we can live.

5. We can't predict the future because we don't know enough about the ageing proces

List of People 

А Aubrey de Grey 

B Caleb Finch 

C David Gems 

D Linda Partridge 

E Benjamin Franklin 

F Martin Brand 

G Tom Kirkwood

Check answer for this exercise 

Attempt this free IELTS academic reading matching headings features mock test

Matching features skill building exercise 3

Answer questions 1-5 which are based on the reading passage below.

MIGRAINE

"One pill makes you larger, and one pill makes you small and the ones that mother gives you, dors do anything at all," words from 'Alice in Wonderland'. It is believed that Lewis Carroll, who made us experience this wonderful journey of 'Alice in Wonderland' also suffered from a Migraine.

Migraine is a complex disorder pertaining to the head, which involves the recurrence of severe and constant headaches. The intensity of headaches ranges from moderate to grievous. Associated symptoms can be hypersensitivity to light, sound or smell, nausea and vomiting. Migraine is assumed to be hereditary and highly influenced by environmental changes. Hormones play a crucial role, especially in the case of boys when they reach puberty, who are majorly affected by migraine as compared to girls of the same age. Contradicting the fact, the number of older female patients is twice or thrice that of males. However, the threat of migraine is less during pregnancy.

In 1988, The International Headache Society provided valuable input on the major classification of migraine - the International Classification of Headache Disorders system - which was later adopted by the World Health Organisation. The research team divided migraine into two prime categories: migraine without aura and migraine with aura. More than three-fourths of the migraine sufferers experience symptoms of migraine without aura: Partial and intense throbbing of the head which lasts for more than 2-3 days associated with nausea and occasional vomiting, blurred or smeared vision and developed sensitivity towards the light, sounds or peculiar smells. In certain cases, symptoms can also comprise stiffness of the neck and shoulders.

The migraine with aura refers to a range of neurological interventions prior to an initial headache Only 20% of migraine sufferers fall in this category. The general complications constitute flashy lights, scintillating scotoma - usually, some zigzag patterns targeting the centre of the vision and encompassing a larger area accompanied with distortions of shapes and figures, blind spots which generally pose threats in the normal working conditions of an individual. Migraine without headaches only comprises 1% of the sufferers. From a tender age Carl, one of the subjects in a study, had seen his father suffer from bouts of severe headaches followed by persistent vomiting leaving him sick in bed. At the age of 45, Carl says," I have been suffering from migraine from the age much younger than my father. It is the worst experience of my life." He further adds, "I mostly feel my genes are responsible for this painful condition. Though I visit the doctor quite often medicines provide limited help." m

The classification system also includes some rare types of migraines. A Hemiplegic Migraine where symptoms often start in childhood or teenage sometimes leads to reversible paralysis due to the excessive weakening of muscles. An Ophthalmologic migraine affects the muscles responsible for eye movement. A Vestibular Migraine or Migraine Associated Vertigo (MAV) interferes with the coordination of sensory nerves from the eyes and ears to the brain.


As per 2004 consensus, almost 80% of people suffer from some kind of severe pain in the head As per which results in high absenteeism in schools, offices and other institutions. How is a headache different from a migraine? A headache is generally an acute pain in the head extending to the neck. As per the researchers at the Mayo Clinic, headaches are discomfort or pain in the head or face. In technical terms, headache is called cephalgias. Headaches can be caused as a result of disturbances in the network of nerves over the scalp, throat, face, resulting in turbulent blood vessels . Tension headaches are the most common types of headaches, the symptoms being acute pain in the temples and back of the neck. Experts believe this could be possible due to changes in brain chemicals. Over-the-counter drugs can give some relief.

Another most frequent headache is a cluster headache. This is more common in men. It causes excruciating pain on one side of the head, accompanied by watery eyes and, at times, nasal congestion. The source and cause are unknown, but hereditary conditions are somewhere to be blamed. Though counter medications can curb the pain, no cure is available. A thin line can differentiate a migraine and headaches with the varying degree of pain, where headaches could be an outcome of stress, hangovers or emotional instability, migraine is actually a disease. In the case of Rosemary, a stock consultant who presumed that alcohol triggered her constant headache later through diagnosis by doctors that high level of estrogen in the birth control pills she consumed played the trick. She says. "It is important to know the triggers that cause and try to avoid them. Having a balanced diet is equally important."

Is migraine curable? More than 35 million people suffer from migraines, and no one knows why. Dodick, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic and president of the American Headache Society, how the thalamus the integral part of the brain which contains sensory information, is for transferring migraine pain directly to pain receptors in the different sections of the. He further states, "Scientists have evolved with a treatment wherein a minuscule battery wired to patient's spine which helps to transmit pulses of electricity to the thalamus. This treatment is called as neurostimulation." Despite this treatment, the antidote is a far-fetched reality. Neurologists from Gulf, Germany and Italy do collectively assert that neurostimulation reduces and controls pain but scientifically it is still an enigma.
 
To resolve this problem, we need to believe that every brain works differently, and so does its cure. Every treatment has to be unique because so is the brain. Comprehensive research is still awaited to cure this ailment. It is observed that each time science thinks it has pulled strings, many more mysteries emerge. Our brain works singularly; hence, the cure needs to be distinctive.

Questions 1-5

Look at the following categories (Questions 1-5) and the list of descriptions below 

Match each category with the correct description, A - G. 

Write the correct letter, A - G, in boxes 1-5 on your answer sheet.

1    Migraine without aura 

2    Hemiplegic Migraine 

3    Migraine Associated Vertigo 

4    Cluster headache 

5    Tension headache


A     disturbs the transmission of messages between brain, eyes and ears

B     neurological factors are responsible for headaches head

C    causes tense muscles in the neck and both sides of the

D     causes discomfort in the eyes and nasal tract along with a severe headache on one side only

E     triggered by external stimuli such as typical odour or noise 

F     could paralyse the body temporarily 

Check answer for this exercise 

Check more IELTS academic reading matching features practice questions

Answers for skill building exercises 

Answers for skill building exercises-1

OBJECTS FROM DIFFERENT CIVILIZATIONS

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.D

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - This famous figurine of the dancing girl from the Harappa region shows the advances made in art and metallurgy at the time.

2.C

Explanation: Paragraph 3 - The imprint on some of the seals suggests that they were used as clay tags for sacks of traded goods such as grain, which indicates that the Harappan people were involved in long-distance trading networks.

3.J

Explanation: Paragraph 3 - Hunting tools indicate that the Indus people were fond of game.
‘Game’- wild animals and birds that are hunted for food or sport are also called game

4.F

Explanation: Paragraph 3 - Many of the toys are carts and animals made from baked clay, and most were for children, which has led to the conclusion that the people had an active social life. 

5.I

Explanation: Paragraph 4 - The oldest ruler with markings was a copper alloy rod, found by a German archaeologist and he claims that it was used as a standard measurement unit ... Measurements of the bricks found in excavations of the Mohenjo Daro and Harappan civilisations match with those on the ruler mentioned by the German archaeologist. 

6.A

Explanation: Paragraph 6 - In the 2nd century, a new kind of paper was produced from rags, bark, wheat stalks, and other materials, which was not only cheaper but was also durable ...

7.G

Explanation: Paragraph 6 - Another significant gift from China was the compass. It was developed after some miners got hold of a piece of a natural magnetite that attracted iron and pointed north.

Answers for skill building exercises-2

Why can't we live forever?

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.G

Explanation: Paragraph 5 - Professor Kirkwood is the author of the influential 'disposable soma' theory of ageing that states the body decays because there is little genetic interest in keeping it going beyond reproductive age.

2.E

Explanation: Paragraph 1 - The only certainties in life, said Benjamin Franklin, are death and taxes.

3.D

Explanation: Paragraph 7 - Linda Partridge of University ... she adds, “I think that we should be working to promote health during ageing rather than on increases in lifespan per se.


4.G

Explanation: Paragraph 4 - Tom Kirkwood of the University of Newcastle's Institute for Ageing and Health asked in Nature: "Why must advocates of life extension make preposterous claims about imminent longevity gains if they are to gain public notice?"


5.B

Explanation: Paragraph 6 - Caleb Finch of the University of Southern California says: “I have a simple view: we don't know what we don't know about ageing processes. So, what can be said on future longevity?"

Answers for skill building exercises-3

Endangered Languages

(Note: The text in italics is from the reading passage and shows the location from where the answer is taken or inferred. The text in regular font explains the answer in detail.)

1.E

Explanation: Paragraph 2 - More than three-fourths of the migraine sufferers experience symptoms of migraine without aura: Partial and intense throbbing of the head which lasts for more than 2-3 days associated with nausea and occasional vomiting, blurred or smeared vision and developed sensitivity towards the light, sounds or peculiar smells

2.F

Explanation: Paragraph 4 - A Hemiplegic Migraine where symptoms often start in childhood or teenage sometimes leads to reversible paralysis due to the excessive weakening of muscles

3.A

Explanation: Paragraph 4 - A Vestibular Migraine or Migraine Associated Vertigo (MAV) interferes with the coordination of sensory inputs from the eyes and ears to the brain 

4.D

Explanation: Paragraph 6 - Another most frequent headache is a cluster headache ... It causes excruciating pain on one side of the head, accompanied by watery eyes and, at times, nasal congestion

5.C

Explanation: Paragraph 5 - Tension headaches are the most common types of headaches, the symptoms being acute pain in the temples and back of the neck

Also, check IELTS academic reading sentence completion

Click the following link to practice matching features with other question types to perform well in the reading test and to check the answers:

Conclusion

Following these tips, strategies, and exercises explained in this article will enrich your skills in answering the IELTS academic reading matching features test. We believe that this article will be more useful to learn and prepare well for the IELTS academic reading task.

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Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

229, Yonge Street Suite 450 Toronto Ontario, Canada M5B 1N9

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

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About Kanan International

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Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.