Lost for words reading answers

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Have you started your IELTS exam preparation? The lost for words reading answers is presented carefully, as it is one of the commonly asked passages in the IELTS reading section. This test will analyse your reading comprehension, understanding ability and the proficiency of the English language. To make your preparation wiser, you need to look at the IELTS reading tips that are suggested by the Cambridge and British Council experts.
 
Students looking to study abroad need to focus on the IELTS academic reading test pattern. This AC reading module contains passage, questions and answers. While preparing, you need to practice 14 different question types. Here, we’ve given the Cambridge 4 test 2 reading passage 1 - lost for words reading answers with its passage and questions.
 

Cambridge 4 test 2 reading answers - Lost for words

Review your answers from the given lost for words reading answers and practice again by reading the passage and the questions given below.
 
1. Isolation 8. C
2. Economic globalisation / globalization / socio-economic pressures 9. B
3. Cultural identity 10. No
4. Traditional skill 11. Yes
5. E 12. Not given
6. B 13. Yes
7. D  

Lost for words IELTS reading passage

Scan, skim, learn new vocabulary with the below given lost for words IELTS reading passage and improve your reading ability to perform well in the IELTS test.

Lost for Words

In the Native American Navajo nation, which sprawls across four states in the American south-west, the native language is dying. Most of its speakers are middle-aged or elderly Although many students take classes in Navajo, the schools are run in English. Street signs, supermarket goods and even their own newspaper are all in English. Not surprisingly, linguists doubt that any native speakers of Navajo will remain in a hundred years’ time.
Navajo is far from alone. Half the world’s 6,800 languages are likely to vanish within two generations - that’s one language lost every ten days. Never before has the planet’s linguistic diversity shrunk at such a pace. At the moment, we are heading for about three or four languages dominating the world,’ says Mark Pagel, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Reading. ‘It’s a mass extinction, and whether we will ever rebound from the loss is difficult to know.’

Isolation breeds linguistic diversity: as a result, the world is peppered with languages spoken by only a few people. Only 250 languages have more than a million speakers, and at least 3,000 have fewer than 2,500. It is not necessarily these small languages that are about to disappear. Navajo is considered endangered despite having 150,000 speakers. What makes a language endangered is not just the number of speakers, but how old they are. If it is spoken by children it is relatively safe. The critically endangered languages are those that are only spoken by the elderly, according to Michael Krauss, director of the Alassk Native Language Center, in Fairbanks.

Why do people reject the language of their parents? It begins with a crisis of confidence, when a small community finds itself alongside a larger, wealthier society, says Nicholas Ostler, of Britain’s Foundation for Endangered Languages, in Bath. ‘People lose faith in their culture,’ he says. ‘When the next generation reaches their teens, they might not want to be induced into the old traditions.’

The change is not always voluntary. Quite often, governments try to kill off a minority language by banning its use in public or discouraging its use in schools, all to promote national unity. 

The former US policy of running Indian reservation schools in English, for example, effectively put languages such as Navajo on the danger list. But Salikoko Mufwene, who chairs the Linguistics department at the University of Chicago, argues that the deadliest weapon is not government policy but economic globalisation. ‘Native Americans have not lost pride in their language, but they have had to adapt to socio-economic pressures,’ he says. ‘They cannot refuse to speak English if most commercial activity is in English.’ But are languages worth saving? At the very least, there is a loss of data for the study of languages and their evolution, which relies on comparisons between languages, both living and dead. When an unwritten and unrecorded language disappears, it is lost to science.

Language is also intimately bound up with culture, so it may be difficult to preserve one without the other. ‘If a person shifts from Navajo to English, they lose something,’ Mufwene says. ‘Moreover,the loss of diversity may also deprive us of different ways of looking at the world,’ says Pagel. There is mounting evidence that learning a language produces physiological changes in the brain. ‘Your brain and mine are different from the brain of someone who speaks French, for instance,’ Pagel says, and this could affect our thoughts and perceptions. ‘The patterns and connections we make among various concepts may be structured by the linguistic habits of our community.’

So despite linguists’ best efforts, many languages will disappear over the next century. But a growing interest in cultural identity may prevent the direst predictions from coming true. ‘The key to fostering diversity is for people to learn their ancestral tongue, as well as the dominant language,’ says Doug Whalen, founder and president of the Endangered Language Fund in New Haven, Connecticut. ‘Most of these languages will not survive without a large degree of bilingualism,’ he says. In New Zealand, classes for children have slowed the erosion of Maori and rekindled interest in the language. A similar approach in Hawaii has produced about 8,000 new speakers of Polynesian languages in the past few years. In California, ‘apprentice’ programmes have provided life support to several indigenous languages. Volunteer ‘apprentices’ pair up with one of the last living speakers of a Native American tongue to learn a traditional skill such as basket weaving, with instruction exclusively in the endangered language. After about 300 hours of training they are generally sufficiently fluent to transmit the language to the next generation. But says that preventing a language dying out is not the same as giving it new life by using it every day. ‘Preserving a language is more like preserving fruits in a jar,’ he says.

However, preservation can bring a language back from the dead. There are examples of languages that have survived in written form and then been revived by later generations. But a written form is essential for this, so the mere possibility of revival has led many speakers of endangered languages to develop systems of writing where none existed before.

Lost for words IELTS reading questions

In the AC reading module, there are 14 different IELTS reading question types. The lost for words IELTS reading questions carries a total of 13 questions. The question types involved in this Cambridge practice test are as follows:

  • IELTS reading summary completion
  • IELTS reading matching features
  • IELTS reading yes/no/not given

Let’s have a look at the questions to start practising.

Question 1-4

Summary Completion

Complete the summary below. Choose NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers 1-4 on your answer sheet.

There are currently approximately 6,800 languages in the world. This great variety of languages came about largely as a result of geographical 1 ____________ But in today’s world, factors such as government initiatives and 2 __________ are contributing to a huge decrease in the number of languages. One factor which may help to ensure that some endangered languages do not die out completely is people’s increasing appreciation of their 3 __________ This has been encouraged though programmes of languages classes for children and through ‘apprentice’ schemes, in which the endangered language is used as the medium of instruction to teach people a 4 ____________ Some speakers of endangered languages have even produced writing systems in order to help secure the survival of their mother tongue.

Check more about the IELTS reading summary completion question types.

Question 5-9

Matching Features

Look at the following statements (Question 5-9) and the list of people in the box below. Match each statement with the correct person A-E.

Write the appropriate letter A-E in box 5-9 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

A Michael Krauss
B Salikoko Mufwene
C Nicholas Ostler
D Mark Pagel
E Doug Whalen

5.   Endangered languages cannot be saved unless people learn to speak more than one language.
6.   Saving languages from extinction is not in itself a satisfactory goal.
7.   The way we think may be determined by our language.
8.   Young people often reject the established way of life in their community.
9.   A change of language may mean a loss of traditional culture

Practice the IELTS reading matching features with different passage

Question 10-13

Yes/No/Not Given

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in the Reading Passage?
In boxes 10-13 on your answer sheet write:

YES if the statement agrees with the view of the writer
NO if the statement contradicts the view of writer
NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this.

10. The Navajo language will die out because it currently has too few speakers.
11. A large number of native speakers fails to guarantee the survival of a language.
12. National governments could do more to protect endangered languages.
13. The loss of linguistic diversity is inevitable.

Have a look at the easy way to solve IELTS reading Yes/No/Not Given question type.

Lost for words reading answers with location

The given lost for words reading answers with location will help you to identify the exact spot where you need to look for the keywords for the question.

1. Isolation - Paragraph 3 - Line 1
2. Economic globalisation/globalization/socio-economic pressures - Paragraph 6 - Line 3 to 4
3. Cultural identity - Paragraph 9 - Line 1 to 4
4. Traditional skill - Paragraph 9 - Line 6 to 8
5. E - Paragraph 8 - Line 3 to 4
6. B - Paragraph 7 - Last line
7. D - Paragraph 6 - Last line
8. C - Paragraph 4 - Last line
9. B - Paragraph 6 - Line 1
10. No - Paragraph 1 - Line 1
11. Yes - Paragraph 3 - Line 4
12. Not Given - Paragraph 5
13. Yes - Paragraph 7 - Line 1

Lost for words reading answers with explanation

Review the lost for words reading answers with explanation to know how to connect the keyword from the question to the passage and identify the answer.

1. Isolation

Keywords: Variety, diversity
Location: Paragraph 3 - Isolation breeds linguistic diversity: as a result, the world is peppered with languages spoken by only a few people.
Explanation: This statement clearly shows that linguistic diversity happens due to isolation.

2. Economic globalisation/globalization /socio-economic pressures

Keywords: Globalization, decline, Socio-economic
Location: Paragraph 6 - But Salikoko Mufwene, who chairs the Linguistics department at the University of Chicago, argues that the deadliest weapon is not government policy but economic globalization. ‘Native Americans have not lost pride in their language, but they have had to adapt to socio-economic pressures,’ he says”
Explanation: This statement shows the reason for the decrease in the number of languages.

3. Cultural identity

Keywords: Interest, preserve
Location: Paragraph 9 - “A growing interest in cultural identity may prevent the direst predictions from coming true.”
Explanation: This statement shows that the growing interest will prevent the language from dying.

4. Traditional skill

Keywords: Apprentice, classes
Location: Paragraph 9 - “Volunteer ‘apprentices’ pair up with one of the last living speakers of a Native American tongue to learn a traditional skill such as basket weaving, with instruction exclusively in the endangered language.”
Explanation: This statement is so direct as it talks about the apprentice schemes.

5. E

Keywords: Endangered, bilingualism, survive
Location: Paragraph 8 - “Most of these languages will not survive without a large degree of bilingualism, says Doug Whalen.”
Explanation: This statement directly refers to the statement that was made by Doug Whalen.

6. B 

Keywords: Saving language, not satisfactory goal
Location: Paragraph 7 - But Mufwene says that preventing a language from dying out is not the same as giving it new life by using it every day. ‘Preserving a language is more likely preserving fruits in a jar’ he says.
Explanation: This statement shows that saving language from dying is not like giving it new life.

7. D

Keywords: Determined by our language
Location: Paragraph 6 - ‘The patterns and connections we make among various concepts may be structured by the linguistic habits of our community.’
Explanation: This statement shows the pattern that determines the linguistic habits.

8. C

Keywords: Young people, reject, established life
Location: Paragraph 4 - People lose faith in their culture,’ he says. ‘When the next generation reaches their teens, they might not want to be induced into the old traditions.
Explanation: This statement shows how young people want to live their life.

9. B (h6)

Keywords: Change of language, loss of tradition
Location: Paragraph 6 - Language is also intimately bound up with culture, so it may be difficult to reserve one without the other.
Explanation: This statement is related to the question which shows that language is bonded with culture, which in change can affect the tradition.

10. No

Keywords: Navajo language, die out, few speakers
Location:  Paragraph 1 - The native language is dying. Most of its speakers are middle-age or elderly. 
Explanation: This statement shows that the Navajo language is dying with just minimum speakers.

11. Yes

Keywords: Large no.of native speakers, fail to guarantee, survival
Location: Paragraph 3 - Navajo is considered endangered despite having 150,000 speakers.
Explanation: This statement shows that even with the large number of speakers, the survival of language is failing.

12. Not given

Keywords: National government, protect, endangered languages
Location: Paragraph 5 - Quite often, governments try to kill off a minority language by banning its use in public or discouraging its use in school, all to promote national unity.
Explanation: This statement mentions what the government is trying to do, but there is no such thing as protecting the language.

13. Yes

Keywords: Loss of linguistic diversity, inevitable
Location: Paragraph 7 - So despite linguists’ best efforts, many languages will disappear over the next century. 
Explanation: This statement is related to the question - the loss of linguistic diversity is inevitable.

Download the lost for words reading pdf and use it for reference

Strategies to solve lost for words reading answers

  • The lost of words reading answers need to be given for 3 question types. To solve the questions, you need to first understand the pattern of each question type.
  • Focus on the relevant term in the passage to get the lost for words reading answers correct in the first try.
  • The lost for words IELTS reading passage will help you with improving your reading ability and vocabulary.
  • To perform the lost for words reading answers to achieve a high band score, you need to practise your time management skills.
  • Give the appropriate spelling while answering the lost for words reading questions.

Check the other reading passages

Practice the reading section with the below given links:

Summary

Lost for words reading answers is all about the extinction of native languages like Navajo. Practise reading the passage to understand the subject and then identify the keyword to locate the answer.

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Global Headquarters

Kanan Intl EdTech Inc

Ph-1, 220, George Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5A 2N1

India Headquarters

Kanan International Pvt. Ltd.

D-wing, 2nd Floor, Trident Complex, Ellora Park Vadiwadi Road, Vadodara, Gujarat 390007

IT/ Digital Campus

Chennai Office

132, Habibullah Rd, Satyamurthy Nagar, T. Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600017

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kanan-ftr-phoneadmissions@kanan.co

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About Kanan International

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Copyright © 2022 KANAN INT EDTECH INC. All rights reserved.